Archived Discussion Topic

Taking older pets to Oz       started by Jules1 on 25 Jul 2007   (14784)
Message InfoMessage
From Jules1

25 Jul 2007 11:11 PM
(70354)
Hi Having decided to make the move to Oz the hardest part is deciding what to do with the animals. We have 2 dogs - 11 and 14 years old and a 14 year old cat and have assumed they are all too old to travel. Any advice would be gratefully received.......
From buffy

To Jules1

26 Jul 2007 1:08 AM
(70378)
Jules1, We also had the same problem of what to do with older pets. Our cat (13) we managed to get taken in by a rescue centre, a lovely old lady with a house made for cats! The dog (12)had to go to the vets as he had a bad heart murmour had lost his spark and the vet said he would probabally of only lasted another few months. This was the hardest and most painful part of the move. The Vet said she would not transport even a younger animal as the stress on them is emmense. My wifes sisters dog was flown to spain and arrived there a sodden stressed out mess. If you dog likes other dogs then dogs trust is an option ours hated other dogs and was stressed out whenever he went in the kennels. Good luck Ian Buffys husband. (Now in Perth in the rain but loving it!)
From mandiepaul

To Jules1

26 Jul 2007 1:36 AM
(70382)
I read a post on here not so long ago about someone who shipped two dogs over one was 12 yrs and the other was 8 yrs ( could be slightly out on the ages ) but I was crying by the end of the post as their older dog sadly passed away after 5 days of being there ! I don't mean to tell you this to frighten you but thought I would share my thoughts . We re-homed our dogs ( both younger than 3 )to 2 lovely familys as I personally wanted to not put them through the stress of flying and then be away from us for another 30 These were not the only deciding factors but the main ones ! I keep in touch with both the families one is already a good friend anyway but I will recieve emails and updates and pictures all the time . I know many have taken there pets and nothing has happened but as I say it is my opinion and only mine we all differ ! There really is no right or wrong on this one ! Only you can decide but maybe you should take them the vets for a MOT and ask his/her advice ! Good Luck whatever you decide , they are members of your family and either way you will be a worried owner for your companions ! All the best Mandie xx
From Rob

To mandiepaul

26 Jul 2007 2:02 AM
(70383)
Hi We have two young dogs both under 4 and there is no question about them not coming with us, yes we are stressed out messes about flying them out and being in quarantine but they are fit and healthy so no reason they wont adapt and cope well. Spoken to lots of peole who have had no problems with transportation of there animals, so fingers crossed. It a hard and individual decision to make though, but im sure you will make the right one for you. Michelle
From AlanG

To mandiepaul

26 Jul 2007 12:19 PM
(70420)
Hi, I think it was my post that you read about our Lab Duke who Died 5 days after arriving in Oz. I think that if you have older dogs and cats, maybe a nervous pet then you should get their health checked and talk to your vet about concerns of transporting them and also speak to the shipping companies about what happens on their journey. I know its a very hard decision to make, we couldn't bare the thought of leaving them behind!!! Sonia.
From caras

To Jules1

26 Jul 2007 2:27 PM
(70422)
HI, we had a 12 year old yorkie and decided that it wouldnt be fair to put him through the trauma (our personal decision with regards to our dog). instead a friend took him a couple of months before we went, i found this was the best thing i did as by the time we were going he had fallen in love with his new owner and i could leave knowing he was happy and settled. so if you are going to leave them find homes sooner rather than later then if you dont think they have settled or their new owner cant cope you have time to find a new home for them. good luck whatever you decide. caroline
From mandiepaul

To AlanG

26 Jul 2007 7:12 PM
(70434)
Yes it was your dog Duke , and I completely agree with getting them checked ! Even though both ours were young my 3 yr old Sally had the odd panic attack and we decided to re-home her . Our other dog Trudy was 1 and fretted terribly even if I went the shops without her , plus we had not lots of money to go with either but there were more contributing factors to but that was our decision and it was a hard one ! I miss them terribly but thankfully they are both happy in there new homes and I see Trudy nearly every week , Sally's new owner emails me and rings me and also sends me pictures ! Everyone's decision for there pets is a personal one , either way it can be heartbreaking ! All the best Mandie xx
From Ljenks

To Jules1

26 Jul 2007 7:25 PM
(70436)
I think you should check with your vet and see if there are any medical reasons why they cannot travel. Different vets give different opinions on the stress involved. Mine told me it would cause my animals more stress if I left them behind. One of my dogs has a condition that means she is on medication for the rest of her life. She has to have it a regular intervals. They all arrived safely in Perth - despite having to be kept in Singapore overnight. The pilot wouldn't take them on the second part of the journey as they couldn't guarantee a constant temperature in the hold. Although I was upset by the delay it also showed me that they really do take extra care when transporting animals. Seventeen months later we moved to Brisbane which meant another plane journey. We saw them just after they got off the plane - no signs of stress and my dogs suffer from seperation anxiety. It's a difficult decision to make but there are so many animals in rescue centres I believe you should bring them with you. When ours were in quarrantine there were a number of older animals there who had all arrived safely and the girls at the kennels gave them a lot of special attention. I don't think there is any right and wrong with this...it's a very personal decision and no-one knows their pets better than their owners.
From karenannmcgrath

To Jules1

28 Jul 2007 6:07 PM
(70572)
Hi We struggled with the decision too, we have 2 Staff Bull terriers 10 and 2, we knew the old guy is scared of his own shadow and noise so we worried about the plane trip, however we could not leave them so they came with us and we shipped them on 4th June, they spent a month in Spotswood in Melbourne and we got them back on 5th July, they are happily sitting at my feet right now snoring away while I write this, he was fine on the trip and well cared for by quarantine staff, if your animals are in good health and you can afford it, take them, I say. if you want anymore details just PM me Karen
From Jules1

To karenannmcgrath

30 Jul 2007 7:30 AM
(70662)
Hi all Thank you for your advice and your experiences. We are in the process of collecting evidence for my husband's spouse visa application, so we have a while yet to decide. In our hearts we know that Molly, our oldest dog, isn't up to the journey healthwise, but will take them all to the vet for a check up once we have the visa. Karen, thank you for your kind offer. Will PM you during the week. Jules
From kimberleyjo

To karenannmcgrath

01 Aug 2007 3:25 AM
(70837)
Hi KAREN Sorry for butin in but we are just at the early stages of our visa we also have staffies three, we have mother,son and a recent addition grandson we would like to take them all but the big two can not be separated and the dog has very bad ears so if he can not go neither can his mom we still have the pup who is only six weeks old it would break my heart to leave them but we can not get an overall estimate from anyone could you give us an idea how much it cost you we are hoping to be there in may 08. We are hoping to go to perth (secret harbour). Our vet says she will do meds on them and then give us a number for a company that we make the grates , i was hoping for a firm that could do every thing or is there such a place.? how did you find getting a place with your dogs ? thats just another worry i wish i was at your stage Thanks and sorry again for butting in but its a relief to know some one esle has the same dog breed and has the same feelings about their animals as we do, Thanks again kim.........
From samval

To karenannmcgrath

04 Aug 2007 12:02 AM
(71053)
Hi Karen, I was glad to read of someone who has taken an older staffy to Australia. After 10 years of living in the UK I'm ready to go home but very concerned about transporting my staffy who is 9 (and will be 10 by the time I go). She's very timid, shakes whenever she hears a loud bang (fireworks, door slamming etc.), likes to be with humans all the time, but she is also healthy, active and happy. I'm just wondering what company you used to transport your dogs and whether your older staffy has a nervous disposition? Was he okay on the journey do you think? How much did it cost you to take them and could you visit them in quarantine? Sorry for all the questions but I can't bear the thought of leaving the UK without her and I'd prefer to hear real stories from people who have taken their pets rather than the quotations you get on pet travel website. Thanks! Sam
From Airpets

To samval

11 Mar 2009 4:57 AM
(102154)
Hi all, When deciding whether to take an elderly pet, always check with your vet 1st of all, they know your pet's medical condition better than anyone. As long as they are fit & healthy showing no signs of major heart problems, infection or other issues that could be affected by a pressurised cabin ( eg glaucoma, ruptured ear drums ), then there should be no reason they cannot travel. However, do be wary of some vets who will just consign your pet to staying at home purely because they don't agree with flying pets for a personal reason. This is very rare, but we have seen it happen. Even pets with serious ongoing problems such as Epilepsy & Diabetes can be flown safely with the correct management, but do always seek your vet's advice 1st. One thing that might be of interest to Staffy owners, this is one breed that we alway fly in the plastic Vari-kennels. This is for 2 main reasons, the Staffy is one of the few breeds who 'fit' very well in the plastic sizes, they are short & wide, just like Staffies. Also, some Staffs are very prone to chew when they get bored and have been known to eat their way out of wooden kennel. Their powerful jaws make light work of a wooden kennel, but they can't manage this with a plastic one Hope this helps. Catherine, Airpets
From halayc

To mandiepaul

23 Jul 2009 6:20 AM
(104848)
Doesn't anyone think that the Australian laws are cruel to pet owners? Why should you have to re-home a pet you love? The UK re-hauled its 100 years old quarantine laws and now allows pets to come into the UK without quarantine if a specific list of medical proof is provided that the pet is disease-free. I am not surprised that some pets don't recover when after a long trip, they find themselves in a strnage environment without any of the familiar humans around. This ads to the stress of having undergone a long distance trip in a dehydrating airplane. Even humans are in shock after long distance flights, and we unlike pets are offered water and food every few hours. I don't see why everyone is coping with this injustice, instead of doing something about it.
From tisme

To halayc

23 Jul 2009 10:26 AM
(104851)
It isn't about the pet owner or the pet, it's about protecting ALL animals in australia, domestic and wild. If you don't want to put your pet through the flight or quarantine procedure, the answer is easy. Don't bring your pet to Australia.
From jimboman

To halayc

23 Jul 2009 1:21 PM
(104853)
In fairness, it used to be six months here (the same as it used to be in the UK), which is the maximum incubation period for Rabies. It is generally a minimum 30 days now from some countries (like the UK) which are considered rabies free. Australia has a history of environmental disasters caused by slack regulations years ago (cane toad, rabbit, fox, Euro House borer etc. etc.). The regulations are not cruel to pet owners, they are kind to indigenous wildlife. It is your choice to come here and bring your pet. If you consider 30 days quarantine after a long distressing flight,to be cruel and yet you are going to do it anyway,who is the cruel one?
From halayc

To jimboman

23 Jul 2009 1:45 PM
(104854)
My choice? Since when do people relocate out of choice? People travel for professional survival. That the case for ambitious internationals anyway, who have no choice but to be ambitious, well educated and own valuable skills because that's the only way they can warrant themselves a decent life. They're offered jobs all over the world because their skills benefit the communities they join. One wonders then why immigration department choses to make their life miserable along the way. The fact is rabies can be tested for in the country of departure, before the animal undergoes the trauma of a long distance flight. A vaccine can be given or refreshed after the animal is tested to guarantee it remains rabies-free. Since can be done by an Australia-approved vet clinic, hell it can be done at the Australian consulate. It would be if animal welfare was considered, or the animal/owner emotional bond. The laws that prevent don't seem rooted in ecology nor animal health to me. I think that they pre-date these notions, and are rooted in ego and power trips.
From jimboman

To halayc

23 Jul 2009 2:37 PM
(104855)
Sorry, I didn't realise that being well educated and professional was a passport to misery, being forced to re-locate from one country to another. I came here out of choice, but then I am just an oink. It must be hell being ambitious. One minute you are living in one place, then the next, your ambition is forcing you (against your will) to move to horrible countries with outdated policies that don't suit you. On the other hand, if you are that driven, why not run for office over here once you get citizenship? Then you will be able to re-write the rules.
From tisme

To halayc

23 Jul 2009 5:44 PM
(104857)
The 2001 outbreak of foot and mouth and then again in 2007 caused devastation to the UK agricultural and tourism industry. Also mad cow disease caused huge problems to industries in the UK. I am glad the Australian Government take seriously the spread of unwanted pests and diseases, and I am sure the Australian Farmers and the tourism trade are also grateful. Imagine a dog being allowed into Australia without a quarantine period and this dog has an unknown disease, the effect could be devastating to many peoples livlihoods. The Australian Government HAVE a duty to help protect all of Australia from unwanted pests and diseases.
From jimboman

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 2:23 AM
(104860)
We lived in Devon during foot and mouth and it wasn't nice. For six months you could see the pyres (and smell them too). It was as close to armageddon as I have seen. Farmers committed suicide daily as their farms were wiped out. Whole areas became off limits to the public, which damaged tourism (Devons 2nd industry after farming). Australia is tough on quarantine because it needs to be. If something took hold here, it would be virtually impossible to contain. The cane toad is well on its way to WA and I expect to have them in my backyard within a decade (should save me a few bucks on beer money).
From jimboman

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 2:23 AM
(104861)
We lived in Devon during foot and mouth and it wasn't nice. For six months you could see the pyres (and smell them too). It was as close to armageddon as I have seen. Farmers committed suicide daily as their farms were wiped out. Whole areas became off limits to the public, which damaged tourism (Devons 2nd industry after farming). Australia is tough on quarantine because it needs to be. If something took hold here, it would be virtually impossible to contain. The cane toad is well on its way to WA and I expect to have them in my backyard within a d
From cs74

To jimboman

24 Jul 2009 8:18 AM
(104865)
Ok, im going to be the one that asks. What and why is the cane toad so bad ? Also why would you save beer money, asume that you will be spending less time in back garden or something ? googled the cane toad but unsure of the full situation.
From tisme

To cs74

24 Jul 2009 9:15 AM
(104866)
The cane toad was introduced into QLD to eat the cane beetle, the beetle was a pest to cane sugar. The cane toad thrived and multiplied and is now spreading across the top end of Australia, now having made it's way to WA. The cane toad has glands behind their eyes which squirt a poison to anything that comes near. They are a major threat to Australian native wildlife, and anything that goes near it, including an inquisitive domestic dog or cat. How Jimboman will save money on beer is anyones guess, haha
From jimboman

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 11:22 AM
(104868)
If you lick the cane toads back, you get as pi$$ed as.
From halayc

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 12:28 PM
(104870)
I am a published researcher, specialized in ecological agriculture. I also chaired ecological engineering committees and I do not advocate the destabilization of any ecosystem in any country. The fact of the matter remains that quarantines originate in pre-science age, and politicians have no scientific foundation to keep this law. In the UK a report by scientists showed that relaxed quarantine laws do not expose the UK to exotic diseases. I, as a researcher, can assure you that politicians always lag behind scientists. The US's attitude towards organic farming, and how oblivious their government is towards the harm of pesticides is an example of that. Another example is Australian quarantine laws. The fact is, if an animal tests negative for a disease, gets vaccinated for it, and tests negative for that disease again then they are NOT carrying that disease. The hurdles in getting this information to your politicians are ludicrous, and you blindly trusting them does not help. In a democracy you are the employer of the legislative body, doesn't that make it your prerogative to control the quality of their work, and how often they do their homework in reading proper science before passing a law founded on science? The Union of concerned scientists in the US can help you understand the obtuse gap between science and politicians in supposedly developed countries: science vs politics!! Click here: http://bit.ly/eT9nA
From tisme

To halayc

24 Jul 2009 1:11 PM
(104872)
Your qualifications do not make you an expert on this subject. We ALL know how often scientist have got it wrong. I say why take a chance when there is no need for one. I would think it better to be safe than sorry. No one HAS to put their animal into quarantine, everyone has a choice whether to bring their pet or not. If you don't like Australian laws the answer is easy. NO ONE can guarantee the safety to any animal, native or domestic without following quarantine procedures. The pollies are there to represent the people not a scientist who probably has got it all wrong anyways, something that wouldn't be found out until it was all too late.
From tisme

To jimboman

24 Jul 2009 1:12 PM
(104873)
Is that right??? I'll stick to wine, haha
From jimboman

To halayc

24 Jul 2009 1:18 PM
(104874)
And there was me thinking that the reason the UK was Rabies free (while it was still common in the rest of Europe), was that it had strick quarantine laws. It is not just about rabies either. Dogs (being grubby, curious and very sociable with other dogs), can carry all sorts.
From deRoberto

To halayc

24 Jul 2009 2:08 PM
(104875)
I think you may have opened up a can of worms!! Check this one out..Not every Aussiemover lives in the city. Does this disease exist in the UK? Zoonotic diseases Hydatid disease What is hydatid disease? This disease is associated with cysts (hydatid cysts) that can form and grow in the liver, lungs, brain, kidneys, bones and other tissues. This occurs in humans but also in animals such as cattle, pigs, goats, wallabies and kangaroos. These cysts are stages in the life-cycle of a small tape-worm of dogs and dingoes. The dog or dingo eats the cysts, the tapeworm develops from them, and the eggs that are shed develop into new cysts if humans or animals, other than dogs or dingoes, eat these microscopic eggs. Is it common in Queensland? Human hydatid disease is most common where there is regular contact between dogs and sheep and where dogs are fed raw offal (lung, liver, kidney etc) from sheep especially, but also cattle, wallabies, kangaroos or feral pigs. If dogs are fed offal containing hydatid cysts, a high proportion become infested with the tape-worm. The true level of hydatid disease in humans in Queensland is hard to determine because many cases go undetected or unreported. About 10 human cases are notified each year. These are generally in older people who were exposed as children, many years ago. Newly detected childhood cases are a major concern because they indicate active infection is occurring. Hydatid cysts are commonly found in sheep and cattle at slaughter in Queensland. While many of these cysts are coming from exposure of sheep and cattle to dingo faeces containing hydatid eggs, producers should also review the management of their domestic or working dogs to ensure they are not a source of infection for their livestock or for people. How could I get the disease? People become infected when the tapeworm's eggs are transferred to the mouth on fingers eg while smoking, or on food. If a dog has the tape-worm, eggs pass out of the animal with faeces and the environment becomes contaminated. The dog may roll in this area and the eggs may transfer to the coat. Usually, the eggs get onto a person's hands as they pat a dog. Occasionally people may be exposed to eggs present in grass contaminated with dog or dingo faeces. Are any groups at particular risk? Due to their close contact with dogs and their tendency to transfer eggs to their mouths with their hands, children are most at risk. The risk of hydatid disease is highest in rural areas or on the edge of cities where dogs and other grazing animals or wildlife come into contact. People in large cities whose dogs are only fed proper pet meat or canned/dry dog food are at much lower risk but should still take precautions against hydatid disease. Where does the disease occur? Usually sheep and dogs or dingoes and wallabies/kangaroos are needed to allow the tape-worm's life cycle to be completed. So any area where these combinations occur can be at risk from this disease. While the risk of hydatids has been well recognised in sheep producing areas, the popularity of working dogs in cattle producing areas of Queensland has increased dramatically in recent years. This has led to a potential increase in the risk of hydatid disease in people because of the large numbers of dogs now being kept on farms that have not traditionally kept working dogs. Recreational pig hunting is also a popular sport, and people in rural or urban areas who keep pig dogs have also been identified as a group at particular risk of contracting hydatid disease from their dogs. Pig dogs often work unsupervised in rural areas where animal carcasses are found and can become infected quite easily. What treatments are available? With human hydatid disease, the cysts usually need to be removed by surgery. Some drugs can be used in special circumstances, but their effectiveness is sometimes disputed. Hydatid tapeworm infection in dogs can be treated with a drug called Praziquantel. This drug is highly effective at controlling all stages of hydatid tapeworm infection in dogs, preventing them from shedding eggs in their faeces. To ensure dogs never pass hydatid tapeworm eggs in their faeces they should be dosed with worm tablets containing praziquantel every 6 weeks. Praziquantel is now a common ingredient in most 'all wormer' worming preparations available from veterinarians, produce stores and from supermarkets and pet shops, but people should read the label of any worm tablets carefully to ensure this drug is present. Worm tablets containing only praziquantel can be purchased where necessary and this may represent a cost saving, especially in working dogs.
From Ljenks

To halayc

24 Jul 2009 2:08 PM
(104876)
You have a point. Quarrantine doesn't always work - just look at the outbreak of horse flu that was brought in by an overseas horse. Some part of the process failed - not sure which part. For me the choice was simple there was no way I was leaving my animals behind. I brought them with me and I have to say that although it was the longest 30 days of my life it's now a distant memory.
From jimboman

To deRoberto

24 Jul 2009 2:36 PM
(104878)
I am beginning to see the light. We are all idiots, who are dumbly obedient to our slave (government) masters. Halyc, fuelled by ambition and international professionalism, is going to come here against his/her will and put the country right by chairing ecological meetings and writing books. Meanwhile, uneducated serfs (like me) will sit around drinking TEDS (or licking the backs of Toads) oblivious to the debt that we owe to the 'ambitious internationals' who are cursed to spend forever travelling the world and solving all of our problems.
From tisme

To halayc

24 Jul 2009 3:25 PM
(104880)
I just clicked on your link. I suggest everyone take a look. It's a site to vote on your science idol, what a load of cods wallop. It asks for full names and email addresses. What exactly was your motive for joing this site?? which you have only just done.
From jimboman

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 3:34 PM
(104881)
I reckon there is going to be a fight in a minute. Not the usual Bogan fight that we all have in the street after one of your parties, but more of an intellectual fight between uneducated Hoons and Scientists. I reckon the scientists will win, because despite their pale white skin, boney physique and ginger hair, they have the power of knowledge which will surely overcome us all. Bogan and proud JIM
From tisme

To jimboman

24 Jul 2009 3:49 PM
(104882)
hahahaha, I love being a bogan.
From jimboman

To Ljenks

24 Jul 2009 3:51 PM
(104883)
Horse flu came in, because Australia relaxed quarantine laws for racehorses, because it was decided that vaccination and other controls meant that quarantine laws were no longer needed. I don't care a monkeys for horse racing, but it proves a point. We went to the Royal Show in Perth last year and due to horse flu, it was the first year ever, that you couldn't take your kids to see the animals after the displays (which is the main reason you go). I think that is 'game set and match'.
From jimboman

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 3:57 PM
(104884)
What is a Bogan? Can Boganism be removed or lessened by surgery? How can you spot a 'bogan' Do bogans know they are bogans? Would a real bogan answer these questions, or would he be too busy drink and drug driving barefoot in his ute, to give a flying........? Over to you Dave...
From jimboman

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 4:24 PM
(104886)
Maybe quarantine could have stopped the boganisation of Australia. They could have put people into little cages for six months and watched for signs of boganenza. Any migrants displaying signs of Boganenza, could have been put down (early symptoms include a propensity to say 'Fu#K' every second word and an overwhelming desire to wear shorts two sizes too small). Australia would then be a land fit for international professionals, who could come here and enjoy the beaches,wildlife and good food while pooch chewed up the possums in the bush.
From tisme

To jimboman

24 Jul 2009 4:35 PM
(104887)
That would have been it for me then, I would have been put down. hahahaha I'm a bogan my children are bogans and now my grandson is a bogan.
From jimboman

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 4:56 PM
(104889)
We are due to take up citizenship. I would also like to take up boganzenship. but I can't find the website? I know that I have to wear only one black thong (very worn) and a pair of stubbies and singlet to the ceromony, but I am worried I won't pass the test. I don't know the ABV of VB, or the names of the Maori bouncers at the Rocky hotel. Also, does my other half need one or two black eyes when attending the ceremony? Does it matter that my kids are both the same colour? You have passed the test, so any hints would be welcome.
From tisme

To jimboman

24 Jul 2009 5:10 PM
(104891)
You also need the beer belly under that blue singlet. The wife also needes to be barefoot, and preferably pregnant, with a durry hanging out the corner of her mouth.
From jimboman

To tisme

24 Jul 2009 5:15 PM
(104892)
Would it help things, if instead of turning up with a Durry, she bummed one off some bloke outside the bottleshop where they do the ceremony? Also, how many cartons of pi$$ does the ceremony cost? The bloke down the pub told me it is one carton per person, but the bloke down the TAB says it is one carton per family.
From Ljenks

To jimboman

24 Jul 2009 5:51 PM
(104893)
It was also rampant because horses are not vaccinated against it here as they eliminated the disease. As you said maybe this is a good example why it exists...... Most people put their dogs in kennels when they go on holiday....
From deRoberto

To jimboman

24 Jul 2009 6:57 PM
(104896)
Maybe you could be the first to coin the phrase 'Pi$$ed as a cane toad' or does it already exist? We should have embraced the habit while we in the Cairns area recently...Cane toads everywhere at night.They may have had an aphradisiac effect if we put some into the heated spa! I think my son was a look alike bogan in the 70's/80's (bogs for short). Black desert boots with ripple soles, check flannelette shirt, tight daggy jeans, long greasy hair, and a knitted black beany. Very grungy. Can't remember the music that they followed but I have a mental picture of them and they sure looked Bogan.
From deRoberto

To jimboman

24 Jul 2009 7:18 PM
(104897)
???I forgot to mention that in the Navy, the phrase for asking if somebody had farted, was 'Who put in for the mob' ..as the years went by it became 'Did somebody step on a Cane Toad'???!
From halayc

To deRoberto

26 Jul 2009 12:53 AM
(104910)
thanks for the reply. The fact is, australian government officials who regulated quarantines are indifferent or underregulated on how stressful, unhelathy and morally abusive it is to pets and their owners. Some Australinas form what I see don't believe it's their duty to scrutinize their government's reasonning, or just aren't evolved enough to empathize with the 'ferners are their cats', and are some people form the deep south of teh US would say. The disease you named can tested for, and quarantine for BEFORE the trip to australia, in the comfort of the pets's home, surrounding by their loving owners. That is not an option because of the inequality between immigrants / visitors and citiznes. You would care if you consider all humans and their pets have equal rights, but apparently some are more equal than others. This is the case in all immigrant countries. It's also a show of power, and a means of intimidation for australian to quarantine animals on their 'turf', and not where the animal has the best chance of recovery and does not take the moral abuse of separation for its family. It's a political show of power, not a medical necessity. This is 1930's medicine, where moral abuse to pets and owners is not taken into consideration. Dr. Irene Pepperberg wrote the book and peer reviewed scientific articles on her experiments with parrot, that proves animals have the emotions and intelligence of a 3 year old. Would you separate a 3 years old from his family for a month? The UK is reconsidergin that, based on advances in science. I think Australia should too. The 'Can of worms' is all the immigrants posting on here, who previously too intimidated to speak of their suffering and their pets illnesses due to the stress of quarantine. Now I encouraged them to speak, while before they thought that as non-citizen they better suffer in silence.
From halayc

To Ljenks

26 Jul 2009 12:58 AM
(104911)
I sympathize with you! I wonder if people who suffer through the animal quarantine process feel disscouraged from comaplaining about it. Laws as far as I understand it shoudl constantly evolve with science. It woudl be scary if in the 21st century, people's egoes get in the way of suggesting that to them. This is a particular scientific finding that I sense autralian officials have not been briefed on: Irene Pepperberg wrote the book and peer reviewed scientific articles on her experiments with parrot, that proves animals have the emotions and intelligence of a 3 year old. Would you separate a 3 years old from his family for a month? The UK is reconsidergin that, based on advances in science. I think Australia should too.
From jimboman

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 1:00 AM
(104912)
As one 'Australinas' to another, could I suggest that you refrain from drinking a whole bottle of brandy prior to posting. I find a half bottle is more than sufficient to fire me up. Any more than that and I start slurring me words. You appear to be on your second crate.
From halayc

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 1:03 AM
(104913)
Australian government officials who regulated quarantines are indifferent or underregulated on how stressful, unhelathy and morally abusive it is to pets and their owners. Rabies can be left out of australia be testing for it, vaccinating, and testing again. It is then impossible for an animal to have rabies, and it can all be done before the trip to australia, in the comfort of the pets's home, surrounding by their loving owners. You would find that an imperative if you consider all humans and their pets have equal rights. Dr. Irene Pepperberg wrote the book and peer reviewed scientific articles on her experiments with parrot, that proves animals have the emotions and intelligence of a 3 year old. Would you separate a 3 years old from his family for a month? The UK is reconsidergin that, based on advances in science. I think Australia should too.
From halayc

To tisme

26 Jul 2009 1:08 AM
(104914)
I believe immigrants have been told not to 'wine' throughout the past century. It's demanding our rights to be treated as equals, not wining, and it's how progress was achieved. Now we can demand that are pets be spared the moral abuse of quarantine. It's also your attitude that causes pet owners to sufer in silence when they move to Australia. Do you realize how oppressive you are? Australian government officials who regulated quarantines are indifferent or underregulated on how stressful, unhelathy and morally abusive it is to pets and their owners. If deemed necessary quarantine should happen in the comfort of the pets's home, surrounded by their loving owners. You would find that an imperative if you consider all humans and their pets have equal rights. Dr. Irene Pepperberg wrote the book and peer reviewed scientific articles on her experiments with parrot, that proves animals have the emotions and intelligence of a 3 year old. Would you separate a 3 years old from his family for a month? The UK is reconsidering that, based on advances in science. I think Australia should too.
From halayc

To tisme

26 Jul 2009 1:12 AM
(104915)
The UNion of Concerned Scientist is one of the think tanks in DC. It enjoys a large finanacila support from the public and lobbies congress. Their employees are for the most part PhD's, and their reports are seminal pieces of literature on ecological sustainability issues. I only say that as someone cited 40 times in peer reviewed scientific journals. Read abotu this organization here: http://www.ucsusa.org/ And yes, they are organizing a vote to select the best social-satire comic to mock how politicans lag behind science.
From halayc

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 1:13 AM
(104916)
here's to scientists and the loving cats (and dogs) that inspire them! Hoping a humane method will be devised in Australia soon to keep it free of diseases without morally abusing animals and their owners. A great site for scientists: http://www.ucsusa.org/
From jimboman

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 1:14 AM
(104917)
'reconsidergin' I have reconsidered gin a number of times. Maybe you should consider giving up gin.
From halayc

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 1:14 AM
(104918)
I believe immigrants have been told not to 'wine' throughout the past century. It's demanding our rights to be treated as equals, not wining, and it's how progress was achieved. Now we can demand that are pets be spared the moral abuse of quarantine. It's also your attitude that causes pet owners to sufer in silence when they move to Australia. Do you realize how oppressive you are? Australian government officials who regulated quarantines are indifferent or under educated on how stressful, unhealthy and morally abusive it is to pets and their owners. If deemed necessary quarantine should happen in the comfort of the pets's home, surrounded by their loving owners. You would find that an imperative if you consider all humans and their pets have equal rights. Dr. Irene Pepperberg wrote the book and peer reviewed scientific articles on her experiments with parrot, that proves animals have the emotions and intelligence of a 3 year old. Would you separate a 3 years old from his family for a month? The UK is reconsidering that, based on advances in science. I think Australia should too.
From halayc

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 1:22 AM
(104920)
sorry for the typos, the rest still stands
From jimboman

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 1:42 AM
(104921)
Not being funny, but why try and change established legislation by moaning on a minority interest web forum? Your arguments may hit a vein with 40% of this sites users, but that is only about 5 people. If you want to make changes to the way quarantine laws work, there must be more effective means!!!
From halayc

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 1:44 AM
(104922)
I'm open to suggestions. I wasn't setting out to campaign at first, but more to see if others have the same concerns as me. Are there Australian animal welfare organizations that would care about this issue?
From jimboman

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 1:50 AM
(104923)
I don't have the same concerns as you. Yes, I accept that it is not nice for an animal to be seperated from its' owner for long periods, but I also accept the reasons. I object to being told by you though, that I am blindly following legislation because I am too weak or stupid to challenge that legislation. Will you be bringing your high horse to Australia as well?
From halayc

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 9:00 AM
(104924)
My high horse attitude was not intended. I am simply in panic over my pet being isolated from me for 30 days, when he's in the most need of my presence to suffer from a long distance flight that will shake up and endanger his health to begin with.
From tisme

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 11:29 AM
(104925)
You are obviously trying to seek supporters for your cause, which looks like no one on here is really interested in. I do not believe your spiel, worrying about your beloved pet going into quarantine, your one purpose on here is to stir up trouble and seek supporters, which looks like it might have failed. Go find another site to peddle on.
From leelise

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 12:18 PM
(104928)
Hi Jim,Sorry to interupt this thread...are you taking up citizenship test or taking up citizenship ceremony? If it's the latter, when is your ceremony? Just curious as we too r in Rockingham shire area and waiting for ours. lise
From deRoberto

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 12:20 PM
(104929)
These laws are not just a whim of the Australian Government. The laws have been in place for 10's of years now and would have been recommended by the highest qualified doctors and vets in the land and reviewed. I doubt whether any Australian animal welfare agency would go along with your spiel. Australia is unique in as much as it is a large country totally isolated and free of many diseases. Not only do we have quarantine laws for incoming animals but we also have restrictions on where you can take your animal within Australia. The National Parks ban dogs and cats from entering and that can be an enormous area..this being to protect our unique wildlife which is depleted alarmingly in some species. We also have restrictions which does not allow dogs to run freely but must be kept in a fenced backyard or on a leash when out walking including beaches, although there are some dog designated beaches along the coast. The latter laws are different in each locality but most people understand the reasoning for this especially when dog attacks are an everyday thing if they are on the loose. There's also restrictions in caravan and camping sites, rentals are often hard to come by, and most holiday accommodation states 'no pets'. Certain breeds of dog are banned from Australia or must be sterilised esp some of the bigger breeds and the list is growing. Australians are amongst the most travelled people in the world and each year dogs and cats are voluntarily placed in boarding kennels for weeks and months at a time to allow them to do this.The kennels are not unlike the accommodation for quarantined pets and more than likely they get much more interaction with their carers. We don't like the fact that we have to put our pets in kennels so that we can go on holidays but personally we have a policy that we do not leave them for more than 1 month..they are 12 years old now so looks as though a trip to UK is out of the question for a few more years yet. Reading your posts to others, it seems that you are letting your fingers do the talking and if you want to keep up the professional status, try using WORD, spell check and cut and paste. It doesn't hurt to have the odd whine now and again.
From jimboman

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 2:21 PM
(104931)
That is something you will need to consider before you emigrate. If you feel that your dog will suffer, either don't bring your dog or don't emigrate. Campaign as much as you like, but I doubt you will have any success. The Australian government is not going to change the laws just to suit one non citizen. Remember, it is not Australian law that will put your dog on an airplane for 24 hours, it is you.
From jimboman

To leelise

26 Jul 2009 2:22 PM
(104932)
We've got to do the test first (just finished our two years).
From leelise

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 3:00 PM
(104934)
ok, all the best.
From Ljenks

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 10:00 PM
(104949)
I take it then that you are vegetarian? What you have to remember is we are talking about a country that does some of the largest live exports in the world. The Australian government knows that many animals (in my opinion the lucky ones) die in transit. The unlucky ones who make it end up being slaughtered in the most inhumane way. These animals could be humanely slaughtered in an Australian slaugherhouse and the meat shipped to these countries. Whilst Australia is not unique in allowing live exports it's something that needs to be stopped in my opinion. It's not only sheep that are exported it is also cattle and horses who meet a horrendous and painful fate at the other end. One of my first memories not long after arriving in Australia was seeing a truck load of sheep being taken to the docks and seeing their legs flapping in the wind because they were broken. I was shoked, horrified and extremely distressed. I rang the RSPCA and told sadly this common. Such a government is not going to give consideration to the relaxing of quarrantine laws. They also still have animals in circuses here which horrified me. To be balanced most people put their pets in boarding kennels if they go away. Mine never had so I had to put them in once or twice before we left so that they got used to it. Whilst they won't let you ship any toys/belongings over with your pet I was allowed once they were in quarrantine to give them things with our scent on. My dogs are very attached to me. They are GSDs - as you know it's in their nature to be that way. Also one of my dogs is hypothyroid. They coped with the journey extremely well and quarrantine too. I think that I was more stressed than them. As an animal lover I completely understand how you feel but have accepted that there are many animals and plant life that are unique to Australia. For me it was the most stressful part of the whole process.
From Ljenks

To halayc

26 Jul 2009 10:12 PM
(104951)
I forgot to add it's not all bad in Australia...I recently resucued a 13 year old GSD from the pound. He was on the PTS list. I'd been monitoring his progress on a website and I thought that someone would step forward. No-one did. I looked at the website one Thursday night and he was on the PTS list for Friday. The normally put them to sleep before 9am. I rang up the pound and they told me that they couldn't bring themselves to do it because he was such a lovely old boy. I had him flown up from Sydney (thank you Qantas for the discount and Mr Branson your offshore call centre were not very helpful!) I had to get a special permit to have 3 so I went to the council and told them his story and they allowed me to have him. The local inspector came out and gave me the permit and said he wished more people did what we had done and pointed out I could have 4 !!! When I went back to the council to register him after the permit was granted the girl up there said she'd been thinking about him and asked after him and told me she'd told everyone about his story. My vet has done two free examinations on him because he's a rescue and has given us lots of help, support and advice on how to get him back into shape all for free. He was a wreck of a dog when he arrived and at 13 I was concerned about how he'd be on the flight but he coped really well although he was 16 kilos underweight, had part of his coat shaved, has CDRM and is deaf! Now he's gained weight, his coat is shiney and he's a lovely looking dog. My point is the council here in Brisbane were wonderful and very accomodating. The inspector was so kind too - so don't judge the Aussie system by quarrantine.
From jimboman

To Ljenks

26 Jul 2009 10:18 PM
(104952)
I've never understood the live export trade. It saves on refridgeration, but the misery caused in ten fold. If a receiving country requires Halal, then surely the Halal process could be carried out in the home country. In Devon (UK) there are visiting slaughtermen, that go to organic farms and 'humanely' kill livestock ready for sale. Far less barbaric than making an animal endure 1000's of miles of torturous travel just to be rewarded with death. Barbaric all the same. I reckon I'll become a veggie again. (we were veggies before we came here, but the smell of steak seduced us).
From Ljenks

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 10:29 PM
(104953)
Jim I couldn't agree more...if it has to be done that is the way that causes the least stress. I stopped eating meat as a young child. I made the association. I find steak to be one of the worst smells lol! I've noticed that the vegetarian ranges are increasing over here - I've been told by someone in the industry that it's due to the 7th Day Adventists who've increased the market range as they are all veggie. The rest of my family all eat meat - I'm the only one that doesn't. I know my views are in the minority so I don't try and force them on others - so I didn't want to offend anyone by my post.
From deRoberto

To jimboman

26 Jul 2009 11:41 PM
(104954)
oWhen we first came to WA in the 70's, the sheep used to be taken to stock yards in South Freo..they are now dismantled. I recollect that they did have a slaughterer for the Halal process at Woodmans Point and I think that there was some contraversy as to the efficiency of the slaughterer and the Arabs refused our exported lamb hence it is now transported live. Maybe Tisme can throw a bit more light on the subject.
From jimboman

To deRoberto

26 Jul 2009 11:57 PM
(104955)
Actually, I lived in Freo in the 70's (Beaconsfield) and used to fish at Robbs Jetty which was the hub of the meat export trade. When I was in primary school, one of our 'days out' was to see lambs being slaughtered prior to being butchered and packed for export. We gave up meat in Devon during foot and mouth. Not because we thought we might catch foot and mouth, but because we saw at first hand, how barbaric the meat industry really is. Our house backed onto fields and every year we would watch new born lambs frolick in the spring sunshine, only to disappear a few weeks later. We would then be kept awake at night by the distressed bleats of the mothers as they searched for their missing young. We still don't eat Lamb, but have slipped back into eating beef products since we came here.
From tisme

To deRoberto

27 Jul 2009 1:07 PM
(104956)
Bit of a joke the export of sheep for Halal meat, a condition of it being halal is it isn't to suffer prior to slaughter, do they think cramming them live onto ships for export they aren't going to suffer. I remember back in the 70's driving the coast road to Fremantle from Rockingham the stench along this road from the tanneries, you held your breath as long as you could, the stench was so bad. I don't know why the Halal slaughter of sheep ceased. there are registered Halal slaughteres in WA, they musn't trust their own kind is the only reason I can think of. Remember a few years back that ship caught fire on it's way to the Middle East with all those sheep being burnt alive?
From Tam

To tisme

07 Sep 2009 1:48 PM
(105599)
In reply to the original theme of this thread: I brought my cat to Australia, she was a rescued cat, so I don't know her full age, but I had lived with her for over 14 years, making her over 15 when she flew to Oz, and she coped with the whole process a lot better than my two 3 year olds! I was really worried about bringing her and got three independant vets to check her out but all said she would be fine and she was. This was nearly four years ago now, and she passed away a few months ago, but I was glad to spend the remaining years with her and to be there at the end. Every case is different, but as long as there are no underlying health problems there should be no problems. Good luck x
From Pete88

To Tam

30 Sep 2009 12:31 PM
(106149)
I'm totally agree with Tam. We also brought our cat,16 years old to Australia and we are still glad we did so. We have so much fun with him and he is every day playing and running and he is still in good health. We arranged the whole procedure with an australian internetcompany called Pets2Australia and had no worries transporting our cat. They really did a good and proffesional job. It's a dutch couple living in Australia. See their page http://www.verhuisdieraustralie.com/english.html Pete88
From jillany

To Pete88

19 Mar 2010 11:25 AM
(107856)
i have a 13 year old Jack Russell who is emmigrating with me to Brisbane in May. She has been my best friend for a long time and I would never leave her. She is a typical Jack Russell, will take anything on, but is also very protective of me. Its good because I intend to do a lot of travelling when I get there. Her health is excellent and she is very fit, even though I had to have some lumps on her tummy checked out for cancer. Thankfully the tests came back negative. I downloaded the forms from the Australian Government and just followed them through. We are getting close to the last bunch of bloodwork before she leaves in just over a month. The vet was quite new to the procedure so it has been a learning process for them too. I also dread putting her on the plane and in quarantine for 30 days but know its for a good reason. She has been in kennels once before for two weeks and was fine. She ignored me when I first went to get her and I expect that again this time. She soon gives me kisses again. The thought of leaving her behind was unimaginable, as no one would or could understand her like I do. I feel so sorry for anyone who can't take their pets. To me they are family and deserve the love returned that they give to us.
From MCKENNA

To jillany

25 Dec 2011 1:25 AM
(111711)
WARNING Pet owners thinking of relocating their 'OLD' pets,dogs or cats, from the UK to Australia should be made aware of the high risk of fatality caused by 'STRESS'. Pet owners mean well but, in general, have no concept of the traumatic stress some pets experience throughout the ordeal. Stress begins from the moment of checking-in for the journey ahead right through to being released from quarantine. I would hate this thread to frighten people from relocating their pets to Australia to share their new lives - it should remembered that thousands of animals pass with no issues through quarantine every year. Thankfully to the best of our knowledge during the past 49 years, 'Animal Airlines' have never lost a single pet travelling to any part of the world (which we do on a daily basis) - including Australia. Anthony
From jillany

To MCKENNA

25 Dec 2011 1:44 AM
(111712)
I moved my dog to Austalia when she was 13 from Canada, handling everything myself. I also moved her back to Canada when she was 14. Only annoying thing was not being allowed to do the paperwork myself for the return trip, although I did a lot of it I wasn't allowed to actually book the airline ticket for her. She showed no signs of distress apart from wanting to get out to go to the toilet. I know the vet has to check them so there has to be an underlying cause, perhaps the particular breed is subject to stress problems. Mine was a Jack Russell Terrier who is now nearly 15 years old and still going strong. I think the secret is to keep the correct weight and fitness for the pet for the travel. Mine had to lose 2lbs before she flew which we succeeded with no problem.