Archived Discussion Topic

MONEY WORRIES       started by stokes on 30 Jan 2008   (17511)
Message InfoMessage
From stokes

30 Jan 2008 11:38 PM
(84485)
HELLO EVERYONE AFTER WATCHING WANTED DOWN UNDER YESTERDAY WE ARE STARTING TO PANIC ABOUT MONEY, AFTER PAYING OFF ALL THE DEBT WE'RE LEFT WITH 20 GRAND FROM THE SALE OF OUR HOUSE HAS ANYONE MANAGED THE MOVE ON ABOUT THIS AMMOUNT WITH THE HOUSE PRICES SHOOTING UP IN PERTH?
From kristeen

To stokes

31 Jan 2008 4:52 AM
(84502)
oh my god.....we are planning the move with about
From jan+paul

To kristeen

31 Jan 2008 6:21 AM
(84508)
I agree with Kristeen, we too won't be going with a massive amount of money but i think if you're prepared to work hard for the life you want to achieve then you'll do it no matter how much or how little money you initially take with you. Jannina
From Elaine+Steven

To stokes

31 Jan 2008 7:04 AM
(84513)
HI Stokes I too have been watching wanted down under, and was starting to think how are we going to manage. We live in a cottage flat in scotland and we wont get a lot for it and the time i pay off all my bills, we'll be lucky to see any off it. So i know as soon as we arrive in Brisbane OH will have to start work right away and once the kids are settle in school i will have to find a job as well. So no holiday for us then :( Elaine
From daryl_louise

To stokes

31 Jan 2008 9:35 AM
(84531)
Hello, We came out with a similar amount of money and my husband got a job easy enough, however, it is is tough surviving on one salary, for a start we can't afford private insurance which is a worry with 2 small kids. If you both can work then I'm sure you woill be ok, however, we are of the situation now, where we either decide to come back or throw everything in to make it work e.g. buy a 2nd car so I can work and we can buy a house. So I would say, yes
From kristeen

To daryl_louise

31 Jan 2008 9:41 AM
(84533)
Hi Louise We have 3 small kids and my partner is looking to get work as a.s.a.p when we arrive in Perth. He is a head chef. My jaw dropped because you couldn't afford private insurance. I take it you are talking about medicare or some form of health insurance. How much is it? Cheers Kristeen
From Boot

To daryl_louise

31 Jan 2008 9:44 AM
(84535)
Louise, Don't say you won't ever get back on the housing ladder in the UK. For a start, their house prices are coming down, and your Aussie dollar is getting ever more powerful against the pound. Eventually, banks will lend again, provided people have reasonable salaries again. Everything is possible! But would you really want to go back and live there? Now there's a question for yas! boot xx
From daryl_louise

To kristeen

31 Jan 2008 10:24 AM
(84539)
Hello Kristeen, we are all automatically covered with Medicare which I believe is like the NHS but most people seem to have private insurance to top it up, I believe it makes the bills cheaper should you need dental care, glasses, investigative procedures etc. I think it's about $150 a month but I suppose you could get a lesser cover cheaper. We've been to the doctors several times since we've been here for general things and it costs after rebate about $20 plus $20 for your prescriptions, it soon adds up (for adults only). However, I don't believe medical insurance would cover this. You can go to somebody that bulk bills for the doctor's appointment but I think you have to wait longer for appointments. I don't want this to put you off but you should be aware that it is no easier surviving out here than the UK. You will get money for your children though which for us amounts to about $800 a month. I suppose it all depends on how much your one income is. The average salary here I believe is about $50-$60k. It's a struggle to live on this salary. Are you planning on buying or renting? If you want some help regarding outgoings I'd be glad to let you know ours. Louise xx
From kristeen

To daryl_louise

31 Jan 2008 10:41 AM
(84543)
Hi Louise Thanks for this...really helpful. We are looking to rent, probably for the first year at least. We have no idea on areas in Perth yet....its so difficult to figure out from here. we have 3 children, all girls, aged 5, 6 and 11. If you can give us an idea of outgoings that would be really great. I know I'll have to get work too....I've always worked full time here but looking to just work part time over there for the first year once we get the kids settled at school. I doubt I'll start working until we have been there for a few months. Cheers
From daryl_louise

To Boot

31 Jan 2008 10:48 AM
(84544)
Hi there Boot, I've been monitoring the house prices in the UK and even if they do come down we'll be looking at about
From Boot

To daryl_louise

31 Jan 2008 3:12 PM
(84555)
Hi Louise, You sound as though your thinking is crystal clear, so no worries there, and no, you're not going bonkers - you just have all the classic hallmarks of being a caring mum. You're right: education is major. Is Australian private primary education better? Answer: it depends which government alternative you're comparing it with! Some of the government primaries do a great job, so let's not knock them. We personally chose private for our littlies, though, because it was reasonably affordable (we pay about 2K, all in, for our two and the Catholic Education Office will reduce fees to just about nothing if, heaven forbid, you ever get low paid enough to be on a health card, as we were at one point) and because, since it was a church school, we found the ethos very structured towards manners, respect and creation of a caring community. I'm not saying some of the government schools aren't like that, mind. Personal choice really. You say your little girl is only 5 and 'behind' her friends in the UK. Well, at 5 years old, she is actually not yet classified as being of primary school age at all - that starts around 6 in Australia. Quite right, too! I'm afraid I am very much of the mind that children should be left to be children, learning through play and personal experience for as long as possible and am thoroughly pro- a later starting date - 6 or 7 years old is ideal - provided they are with loving adults and have good opportunities to socialise with other kids. From all that I have managed to access statswise to date, it seems the countries in which kids do better ultimately (and where there is higher uptake of tertiary educational opportunities) eg in Canada, Australia and the Scandinavian countries, they start school later. Much of mainland Europe starts school at 6, too - it's only in the UK where (in my humble opinion) we push our kids to death and wonder why they get stressed out, tearful over SATS, 11 plus etc and start flunking out by the time they're 14 - especially boys. Be reassured that Australia, from the latest OECD countries survey, by the time your children are 15, rates amongst the highest in the world for education. In science, for example, Australia is ranked higher than any country in Europe apart from Finland (world leaders overall in education) and Estonia (which is a very small country so possibly less statistically significant). In fact, I fought to keep my older boy (now 10) out of school for as long as possible in the UK. The (Australian) Principal of the school had taught in both systems and saw clearly the benefits of letting kids start properly slightly later (especially boys, who in the early years lag girls developmentally, whose confidence can get knocked severely by early, unfair comparison with their better equipped female classmates) - he was practically begging mums of end-of-year birthday children to keep them out of the system for as long as possible. However, the class teachers put the fear of God into me that I was doing my son a disservice if I didn't get him into Reception. So in the end, I relented and he did a month of part-time Reception before starting school just after his 5th birthday in June, to orientate him in the routine before he HAD to start full-time in September - that was unfortunately just about as long as I could keep him, by law, out of the system. However, he only did a year in the English system and the younger one started school in Australia at 6. Today, both of them are in Talented & Gifted programs. Must say, though, like you, I found it weird that, when we arrived from the UK, my children could read well etc, whereas the Australian kids were still making cookies and cakes in the shape of alphabet letters! The learning does accelerate, though, around year 4, 5 and 6 and ultimately, I feel, they end up just as far on as their UK counterparts, if not further. But unless you are in the catchment area of a good Government high school, I personally would be prepared to pay for private secondary education. I just don't know enough about particular Government schools and because we happen to want a church school, there's no alternative for us but private. I suppose the only way that it would potentially be a problem would be if you were to return to the UK - but I suspect, at the age your little girl is, the amount they will have covered in school anyway is fairly limited at this stage, so she would catch up quickly enough. Re staying in Australia... does being here now commit you to staying forever? I have absolutely no idea whether we will retire in Perth, and that's the exciting thing - anything can happen! We're 46, so are much further on than you are (I had our babies at 36 and 38). In your thirties, so soon after giving birth, often giving up a job and sustaining a big dose of extra expense through the sudden arrival of children - wherever in the world you are - it is hard to imagine ever being free to change course, study something new or being out of the childcare trap...but it comes so quickly! I'm back at uni now getting some more qualifications and to be honest, was amazed to see how many middle aged people do so in Oz. It is absolutely normal to be studying here and it seems to go on for a lifetime (my aunt is on her third degree course at UWA at 81 years young!) There are so many job opportunities and chances to retrain here - unlike in the UK, where uni can cost a fortune, there aren't 5 uni's to choose from on your doorstep, and at the end of it, you're joining a big queue of applicants (some of whom will do the job for less than you will, too.) Maybe you could promise yourself a new direction when the kids are a bit bigger? Re mortgages... how very overrated they are! If you need to borrow and hock yourselves at these ridiculous prices right now, why not take the pressure off and continue renting - that way the landlord is subsidising your living? There are ways to invest the difference between paying rent and a mortgage and grow your capital more rapidly than you would by investing in property - so that would ultimately make your deposit bigger at a time when home values are only growing very modestly (as looks to be the case for the foreseeable future in Perth). I believe that Australian society is overleveraged and overborrowed just like the rest of the Western societies and you may well find that, in the future, somebody may be only too grateful to accept a revised down offer from you to get rid of the mortgage noose around their neck. Anyhow, if you're enjoying it day to day and so are your kids, does anything have to be done? I'd just enjoy your life and enjoy your kids if I were you because at 38 you ARE still a spring chicken in today's terms (even the skilled visas are allowing people in up to 45). 40 is defo the new 30, you know! Just a few thoughts from a sympathetic mum. I wouldn't sweat the depressing calculations if you're not planning to go back to the UK immediately. Bear in mind, too, it only takes a change in the two countries' respective economic positions (in the present downtrend, Australia I firmly believe will overall fare better than the UK) and an exchange rate movement and the whole picture changes again. But if your heart is in the UK, that's something else. Just the thoughts of an old codger. And you thought YOU were a waffler... Hugs, boot xxxx
From verp

To Boot

31 Jan 2008 4:20 PM
(84556)
Nice post Boot Agree education is a big issue for anyone thinking of the move. You make a fair point about which government alternative your comparing it against. Our two daughters spent time in the Scottish, International (following the English Curriculum) and then the Australian system. I can say for the primary education, Australia was the lowest of the three in terms of the quality with certain aspects of the teaching, but then that
From rockinghorse

To verp

31 Jan 2008 5:51 PM
(84560)
Interesting post.. Some kids want to learn. My little girl is so desperate to read. She is 4 and would of been in full time education in the UK. Here she won't start fo another year so she will be 5 1/2. We applied for the 4 year old kinder program to be told we wouldn't get a place. So we chose Montessori, she loves it. It's such a releif for us because when we first arrived we put her in an ABC childcare and they traumatised her for spilling water. Have spent all year trying to convince her ladies are nice. She was terrified of females!! I personally beleive it depends on the child. Both mine Lucy and Sam want to learn. Sam's only two, speaking in clear sentences. We do read alot to them and get them to participate. Personally I didn't have the opportunity a very good academic education. I couldn't read at 9 and don't ask why as it's a long story but left school at 13. I have achieved alot in my years by being self taught. Have been self employed involved in various businesses. Fully qualified aromatherapist, sports injury speacialist. Retrained to get me my visa as a hairdresser. So looking at my schooling I had crap teachers with big class numbers and nobody picked up on th fact I couldn't read until I moved to a country school. Then had good techers smaller class siz and read the equivilant of 12 months books in 3 month.. So in my case I often wonder what I would have achieved if I had completed my schooling. According to a good friend of mine who's a school teacher, she reckons alot of children aren't ready until they are 7 maybe 8. Michelle
From Boot

To verp

31 Jan 2008 5:53 PM
(84561)
Sure, verp. I've heard it said that the Scottish system is quite different from the English one (and most who've experienced it have told me it's 'better' - ooh, don't want to start a war now!) My kids are friends with academically able Asian-Chinese children here who excel at school but seem forever to be studying, even on weekends! Clearly it's a cultural difference - and taking a look at the current fortunes of Eastern vs Western societies in terms of development, business etc, who are we to judge which approach is best? There must be a happy medium - I hope! Let's just say that at this stage, I'm not too concerned about the education my two are getting - and it's not only about academics at the end of the day, it's about adjustment and attitude, isn't it? But yes, I appreciate not everyone will be happy with their Australian school, and admittedly I am PAYING, so it should be half-decent. Thanks for the good post. Regards, boot
From desperate

To Elaine+Steven

31 Jan 2008 8:54 PM
(84576)
Hi Everyone Been a little while since i posted. Hoping to come out end of June (house on market next week) when my daughter finishes her GCSE's but now starting to worry financially..... we are by no means comfortable and i have to put in a few hours overtime every month (i work part time)to make ends meet but.... we do have savings/safety net which we would use to get us to perth and knowing that security of our safety net is gone is scary! Also, we are going over with no jobs...... OH in welding trade BUT having diffs trying to get copies of his certificate. I'm with the ambulance service and currently WA St johns are suspending all overseas recruitment...... So, basically we're coming, putting stuff in storage, dog being baby sat, giving ourselves 6 -8 weeks to find decent jobs, if lucky send for stuff and dog, if not.... shit!!! need to return in time for daughter to start 6th form. but of course we would lose all our savings.......(and our house) Anyway, my burning question is...... what is average/survival salary what is average mortgage what is average outgoings I have done so much searching on internet but everything seems so contradictory (however its spelt) and just want a 'straight' answer (soz, don't mean to sound rude....) Matt did give some basics on average mortgage, which was really high.... just over double what i'm paying now but what sort of salary do you need to achieve to be able to make those sort of repayments and still be able to live a little? Also, have read somewhere that housing market is now slowing down in Perth?? true? sure hope so, with pound weakening everyday!!!! AAAARGH...... oh the doubt is soooo creeping in re whether to go or not...... just don't want to regret it if we don't and don't too want to loose our safety net..... oh what to do...... Guess it would be a tad easier for me as i have no family to leave (i'm from sunny south africa) but do have really good network of friends. Guess ultimately i want same lifestyle i had when growing up in Cape Town, but hey, i didn't have responsibilities then, that was all my mom's problem!!!!!! Thanks everyone for listening syls, marcus, jess (16), jack (2) and diesel the dog x
From Mumbly

To desperate

01 Feb 2008 12:06 AM
(84598)
Go and live a little on the wild side. I amdire your gumption for at least thinging about it. But you have come this far...don't give up now. I am excited at the prospect of a new land with a new beginning after all the money worries we have had over the past five years. We will have very little cash when we get there but we live quite frugally and have the willingness to try something new in a new country. Uk is going downhill and children here have a poor quality of life not to mention adults in general. Bills, high taxes, high cost of fuel, and a government which is so out of touch with the 'man' on the street. Go to Oz and make your own success happen. You're both willing, able and willing....go for it!
From shell01

To stokes

01 Feb 2008 1:12 AM
(84600)
hi We came here aliittle over 3 years ago with 4 children with included a 5 month old baby along with 6 suitcases and about $5000, don't know how we did it but we did, it's well worth it if you stick at it!!! we are now just moving into our own home, as we've been in rental accommodation up until now. The kids adapted really well and they are happy and have a great life!!!
From BrownFamily

To daryl_louise

01 Feb 2008 1:23 AM
(84601)
Hi - if your daughter is having fun drawing pretty pictures, let her enjoy it! England is one of the few 'civilised' countries in the world to start children at school at 4. Most other countries start them at 6 or even 7 and has been proved time and again that children do better the later formal education starts. I had loads of Aussie friends at Uni and they were all as well educated - if not better - than UK students. I wish England would let children enjoy their childhoods a bit longer - free play and social interaction teach more than any amount of spelling lists or times table - they've got a possible decade and half of 'real' education ahead of them. Let them have fun! Bev Brown (Mum and Primary School Governor)
From desperate

To Mumbly

01 Feb 2008 1:30 AM
(84603)
Thanks Mumbly, I like your way of thinking..... oh but i'm a worrier, so my OH keeps telling me. Yep, i'm just passed the big 40 (mmm 41 to be exact, but don't tell anyone...tehe) so i guess it is time to start living............ syls
From BrownFamily

To Boot

01 Feb 2008 1:40 AM
(84604)
Hi - have been reading your messages (see mine in agreement with you about kids starting school too young) and hope you don't mind answering a few questions. When we arrive in Perth (hopefully Oct) I too am looking for a new career and have looked into training to be a teacher at one of the Unis. Is it very expensive to study -will it make a difference as we won't be citizens for a few years? (We have a permanent visa.) I have looked at the Edith Cowan Uni - do you know anything (good or bad) about it? Any help, advice or words of wisdom would be more than welcome. Thanks Bev Brown
From Jon_H

To daryl_louise

01 Feb 2008 8:41 AM
(84618)
Ok we have all experienced this worry about money. In comparison it is about the same in cost as the UK, it is swings and roundabouts, food is noticeably cheaper in the UK. Medical insurance, for advice I suggest you look at the medicare website, it does not cover everything, ambulance cover and dental cover is not included so you either pay or take out private to cover these, bulk billing doctors are good if you can get in one, but prescriptions vary depending on what they are, I take singular a tablet for asthma, I have taken it in the UK for over 10 years, here it is not available on prescription through medicare so I have to pay its full cost which varies from $125 to $70 for 28 days supply. Some of the medication is different and some of the medication available in the UK is not available here. Private insurance can cover the difference in the short fall between the two costs Check out the medicare website http://www.medicareaustralia.gov.au/ and centrelink for childcare benefits. http://www.centrelink.gov.au/. The advantages of this country, sun, sea, sand, the very laid back lifestyle and the excellent pensions. The aussies motto appears to be, plan for today not for retirement.
From Trudie

To Jon_H

01 Feb 2008 9:53 AM
(84631)
most companies (not all) that you work for offer a discount for private health care cover. it is worth taking this out as we went to the opticians the other week and with 2 eye tests and 3 pair of glasses one of them being the designer sunnies, the total came to $450 with the discount couldnt imagine paying full price lol. we have the top cover for hospital ambulance etc and i think this is around $170 a month i would rather spend that and go to the beach once a week then to being wondering where the money is going to come from when the children get sick.
From daryl_louise

To Trudie

01 Feb 2008 10:40 AM
(84634)
Hi Trudy, I understand your comment about the medical insurance being worth it and believe you me, I wish we could afford it, our daughter wears glasses so I know that in the next couple of months we are in for a shock, however, if you haven't got $170 a month spare then you just can't do it. We are finding that all we can afford to do is go to the beach and nothing else and that is without medical insurance. We have ambulance cover as we know this is essential though. Louise
From woody9

To desperate

01 Feb 2008 11:16 AM
(84636)
hello to you - I guess you could find out the average mortgage from some financial figures but to be honest, it makes no difference whatsoever - there are too many variables to take into account. the suburbs of perth are so varied, like most places, so house prices vary dramatically. consider also the other thread about schools - suburbs with 'good' schools are so much more expensive to buy in. it looks like you have two kids so you will need to consider schools. one of the main difficulties people with kids have is getting them looked after so that they can work to supplement their income, without the extended network of friends/family they might have back home. that said, there appears to be more flexibility for part time work here - my wife tells me loads of the mums she talks to at school only work school hours. also, it is very common here for older school kids to work at the weekend/after school in woolies, IGA etc so your older child will be able to make her own money - I know you may not want them 'working' but nearly all teenagers here appear to do it and lets face it, they will need cash to get out and about, go to places etc with new friends. also remember that there is no council tax here and the shire/water rates are considerably less (well for us and our friends anyway). also about private health care, people seem to forget that those who worked back home paid national insurance which paid for the so-called free health care at home - our private top-up which includes dental, optician and ambulance, is less than half of what we paid in national insurance in england. outgoings we find are probably on a par with england (we have two kids aged 9 and 12) - some things more, some less. we are not big spenders but like to eat out and go away for the day. we live very comfortably here, but not better than england - just different. plus, we dont need to save up 5 grand a year for our two weeks in the sun anymore!! i know of a few welders and i am told work is pretty easy to come by - about 20 - 30 dollars an hour i'm told - that is in perth itself. you can apparently earn more $ per hour doing contract work but you dont get holiday pay and benefits etc. so i would say if you dont have a lot of money to set you up and you are not going to be earning 200k, forget building your dream home, the big house with the pool for just now anyway. consider a suburb like Kingsley, which is nice, has reasonable plots and you can get 3x2 houses (many others are mainly 4x2 which pushes cost up) with good sized garden for less than 500k - might need a bit of TLC mind! and remember - your worries are normal - you would probably be feeling it even if you were not worried about money - only natural. good luck
From desperate

To woody9

01 Feb 2008 1:25 PM
(84641)
Thanks Woody As my daughter already has a little job at Sainsbury's after school, she's all ready and prepared to work again - woo hoo...... guess my prob is i'm a bit stubborn too, want to buy and buy the dream house of 4x2 with pool, theatre room, games room, double garage, study etc etc (tehe) but at mo, guess i'll just have to dream on. Suppose its a goal to work towards though and as everyone says, the dream is the sun, beach, healthy lifestyle etc and its only up to us to make it work. And yes, what you say re childcare is true (and frightening) as my 2 year old goes to nanny when i'm working so we have no extra expenses there which will hit us in the pocket hard. Maybe should send OH to the mines, earns zillions and i can be a housewife..... he has other ideas though, i'll be working and he'll be a beach bum! Would be nice not to work at all but as i have a professional career, i think its important to keep my hand in it and ideally would work part time, but that will have to come later. (after the pool, 4x2 etc!!!!) Difficult to know too where to live. We were really taken with Aubin Grove and Atwell but i noticed you can get more for your money NOR ie butler and Quinns but i suppose a lot of it depends on where OH finds work. Thanks again, and hopefully it wont be long before we're there. x
From jimboman

To stokes

01 Feb 2008 9:48 PM
(84669)
The fact is, that if you liquidated your assetts in the UK and moved 10 miles away, it would be just as daunting. When you move here, you are moving your life as it is, to the other side of the world. If you are poor in the UK, you will start poor here. You are changing your surroundings and your proximity to family and friends. Your financial situuation will not change overnight . You can't go from hard up in the UK to posh in Australia just by jumping on a plane. My reasons for coming here were because I was brought up here. Not because I wanted a big house with a pool. We are no better or worse off financially than if we had stayed in England. In my opinion though, long term, you will be better off here because the world economic situation favours Australia at the moment whereas the UK is in for a pasting. Also, summer here is summer (hot days, no rain and you can make plans). JIM
From cymro

To jimboman

02 Feb 2008 12:44 AM
(84694)
'Also, summer here is summer (hot days, no rain and you can make plans).' Hi there Jim, Sorry, that comment made me smile. Rainfall figures for January here are: nearly 400mm, and 25 days rain. School holidays were a washout, and my kids have never played so many computer games/watched tv. Beaches were closed for long periods due to dangerous surf and pollution caused by severe flooding further up stream. In fact all we could do was make plans, as the weather was too bad to do anything else. The lack of anything to do here apart from the beach was thrown into sharp relief. Yes the phrase 'Life's a beach and then you die' certainly comes to mind. Oh and the long term forecast is rain till June, and very wet in March (very wet must mean water chest high rather than knee high I'm guessing). I know you haven't had any rain in Perth since about 1887. I have friends in Perth, who regularly, and somewhat cruelly, like to point out this fact as I sit at home recovering from another bought of trench foot. Still, when Tim Flannery's predictions come true and you all have to move over to the East coast (or possibly to 'Geothermia') then we'll all be in the same boat (probably literally).... Things are looking up here though, it's not rained yet in February.
From Pinkachew

To jimboman

02 Feb 2008 4:18 AM
(84708)
Still a condescending idiot I see Jimbo.....
From jimboman

To Pinkachew

02 Feb 2008 8:41 AM
(84714)
As Friday night is the main night for 'High Class' lapdancing, I am suprised to see you on here. Or do you specialise in half price pensioners specials on Wednesday afternoons? JIM
From jimboman

To cymro

02 Feb 2008 8:47 AM
(84715)
If it makes you feel better, I have just been woken by some pretty heavy thunder (followed by three spots of rain). A couple of months back, a bloke from Brisbane came to work with me in WA for a few weeks. He was complaining about the drought. Not anymore though.
From KERICAREOLOW

To Pinkachew

02 Feb 2008 9:03 AM
(84717)
oh here we go again
From Boot

To Pinkachew

02 Feb 2008 12:19 PM
(84730)
Now who on earth would deem the previous message in this thread worthy of an info rating???? Folks never cease to amaze... boot
From Themints

To Boot

02 Feb 2008 12:57 PM
(84731)
I was wondering what you were all talking about, I forgot that I have added Pinkachew to my ignore list and I don't see any posts from them. :-)
From daryl_louise

To Boot

06 Feb 2008 4:37 PM
(85073)
Hi Boot, Sorry it's taken so long to reply to you but I wanted to do it when I had more than a spare minute. I personally agree with you that children should be children for as long as possible and that starting school at 4 in the UK is too young. I suppose one of my concerns is that 'if' we return to the UK she will be behind her peers, if we stay out here then it's obviously not a problem. However, one thing that does concern me is, I am surprised at how so many people appear to have 'slipped through the system' and appear to have not even the basic fundamentals, I have encountered this many times at restaurants, shops etc and have been shocked at how they struggle to add up or even be able to write down your order correctly. I have also heard of children not even being able to count to 100 at 10 or 11. There was also a piece in the paper the other day, I can't remember which one that stated that West Australian schools were poor in comparison to other states in Australia. Macy's school does seem very good and I don't have any bad words to say about it yet but who knows how her education will continue when she's say 9 or 10. With regard to mortgages, I know you're right but having been a home owner I'm finding that renting doesn't feel like home to me and I can't settle. I like to be able to decorate and make my mark on my home, when it's rented it can be very frustrating with simple things e.g. we smelt gas for months before they would finally replace the oven hob, it was so bad you could smell it when you opened the front door and I know when we leave that somehow they'll find something so they can re-coup this, we were stung in the UK too. You have so many words of wisdom, you're right, why do I have to decide where the rest of my life is going to be, I suppose it's because I'm frightened of messing up my childrens lives or losing them when they are older and they go back to the UK (like I did!) Anyway, I was hoping to end this on a more positive note but I've now got to dash and pick up Macy. You should add counselling to your many other talents!! Thanks Boot you talk a lot of sense, I guess I'm just a born worrier!! Louise xxx
From laura

To daryl_louise

06 Feb 2008 5:37 PM
(85076)
Hi there if this helps i dont know, My son has just enrolled in a state school in Adelaide named West lakes shore. Its great they have 4 hrs of homework every week with lots of time for sport ect. Very understanding of the individual childs needs and great parent teacher communication. im very pleased with it. Laura And Jarrett.
From Boot

To daryl_louise

06 Feb 2008 7:25 PM
(85077)
Hi Louise, I worry, too! Counsellor? I'd be dreadful!! If you want to buy to feel more at home, do so. There is the chance of the global slowdown affecting house prices, but your home is your home, not just an investment. And they go up again. It's rather having loads of investment properties that I think could be problematic in the event of a house price downturn. But many would argue that Australia's situation is a little different to the rest of the world, with economic fundamentals good. Interest rates, while they will undoubtedly rise in the short term, may well come down in the medium to longer term, if the whole globe is struggling economically. And with other investments at the moment, eg the share market, being hard to fathom and no longer offering the instant financial gratification that they once did, you may find people in Australia start looking at bricks and mortar again. At least houses don't get wiped out overnight by money market developments (unless you happen to be somewhere where freak weather events strike you!) I don't think anybody knows what's going to happen at the moment. I mean, the US announces yet more appalling figures on their service sector, the Federal Reserve sharply cuts US interest rates and yet the US dollar rallies.....eh? All sorts of contradictions going on at the moment! I am sure there must be some fiddling going on to support Wall Street interests - and I wouldn't be surprised if various central banks and governments are working in tandem round the clock to avert worse things happening. Have to dash now! boot xxx
From thejourney

To daryl_louise

04 Nov 2009 2:39 AM
(106609)
We have been here for one month tomorrow - hooray! Have logged on for first time in ages and couldn't help but to reply to your message and answer from Boot - she is soooo right. We are both secondary teachers and know that the Swedes gain the world's highest A-level equivalent scores and start their primary education at 6 or 7...the UK is starting to learn from their European counterparts with the EYFS and removing some testing... slowly but surely. Our 4 and 7 year old have started govt schooling and our 7 year old is being challenged daily with spellings, tables and literacy etc. Our 4 year old is given books to look at or read with no formal monitoring - all at her own pace... which serves her well. The teachers are fabulous. I have to say it has cost us a fortune and the exchange rate makes us feel quite heavy hearted having just sold our house and bought one here for twice the price for a little less space inside and a little more outside. Yet each time we need a reality check we cycle or drive to the beach and watch the sunset over North Beach or we go to Hillary's and let the children play in the sand etc whilst we admire the beautiful scenery. I have been won over by Perth and hope I am here always - we are on a 457. The people here are open and friendly - as are most in the UK in the peak of summer, of course! So many people have knocked on our door and welcomed us with telephone numbers for doctors and dentists etc it has been overwhelming. By the way, we cannot afford private medical care - and within the first week had two small children with chest infections - dealt with through the medicare system (and we hadn't even registered but could claim back the upfront charges). If we had more money we probably would pay for private (I have been told $200 is average?) like most others but we are broke and have double the mortgage we had in the UK to pay so have less disposable income (and one less adult working p-time than before leaving). Money can be a worry but I have saved
From mollytaylor

To thejourney

04 Nov 2009 5:20 AM
(106610)
BRILLANT POST FROM THE JOURNEY WE CANT WAIT TO GET TO PERTH HURRY UP VISA
From Mindblower

To thejourney

04 Nov 2009 11:23 AM
(106614)
Good post that.
From thejourney

To Mindblower

04 Nov 2009 4:28 PM
(106615)
Pleased it has been absorbed well... Perth is everything it promises as long as you focus on what you have in front of you which is easy as it is absolutely stunning here. All the best to those in the UK... all the form-filling, moving of furniture, organising and loss of
From Boot

To thejourney

05 Nov 2009 3:03 AM
(106620)
Ello, y'all. I hardly ever come on here, either... then I suddenly come on tonight - like you, for the first time in ages - and someone's actually remembered me! Blimey. I am very flattered. Another coincidence: I, too, am a school teacher and private maths tutor! Re the ongoing education debate... Since coming on here last time, I haven't changed my views one iota in favour of the later start to primary education. My own kids' academic performance is proof that a later start can be highly beneficial. They are both considerate, well-rounded, responsible kids who not only plan and do all their work but still have heaps of hobbies, loads of friends, a sense of moral and social responsibility - and never stop telling me how 'awesome' their life is here. Our older boy starts sailing lessons through school next week. This on top of surfing, outward-bound, flying fox, surf lifesaving, raft-building, team-building skills, goodness knows how many musical instruments, rafting, scuba diving, performing arts festivals etc... At high school, they will be performing with orchestras, swing bands and ensembles at schools in Singapore. They also get the chance to visit missions and orphanages in Vietnam. Even now, in primary school, they are despatched to read to the elderly folk in the nearby aged care home. Fabulous. IMHO, Australia is making our two boys into very well-rounded, nice to know young people. We certainly couldn't offer them the same life in the UK. Regards to y'all, boot xxx
From pop

To thejourney

04 Jun 2010 3:59 AM
(108567)
we have just started using this site and starting to get the hang of it We arrive perth sept 2010 . just read your comments thankyou youve made our day from just reading it.