Archived Discussion Topic

IELTS       started by sandyra on 23 May 2012   (24044)
Message InfoMessage
From sandyra

23 May 2012 12:36 AM
(112075)
Hi all, We are 1 point short on our Reading to be able to get the superior score which we need for the points for our visa. Is it just a case of having to take it again or do you think they will accept that ? Please advise Cheers Sandy
From WA6

To sandyra

23 May 2012 7:55 AM
(112076)
Hi, I don't know which type of Visa you are going to apply for but if you need points it will depend on if you have enough points without the superior English points that are awarded. My husband needs to get an 8 or higher to have enough points to even qualify for a GSM Visa. Good luck! Best, Megan
From jimboman

To sandyra

23 May 2012 7:01 PM
(112081)
Unless the system has changed, if you need (say) a 100 points for a certain type of visa, then you must have the 100 points for your application to be considered. There is no grey area where they allow people who fall a couple of points short to apply. If you have done the test once already, then there is a good chance that next time you will ace it. We didn't have to do IELTS because believe it or not, five years ago being a native English speaker was enough to prove that you knew English enough to settle in Australia. Sadly, commonsense seems to have flown out of the window and even having a degree in English from Oxford University will not get you a bye from the IELTS now. Good luck.
From KathrynG

To sandyra

23 May 2012 7:52 PM
(112084)
Jim is so spot on, when we applied 5 years ago we did not have to sit the English test either, us all being native English speakers. It really is the same with gaining citizenship, we got our visa the day in July 2007 the rules changed, meaning we had to live here for four years before we could apply, has opposed to the two years it was previously. Perhaps it is because people used to learn English just to get by hence saying they could speak it when it was at best sketchy. I also note that spelling and grammar these days is getting much worse, so really has horrible as it is to sit the test it is also not a bad thing. At least with a second shot at it you should crack it. Good luck.
From sandyra

To WA6

23 May 2012 8:25 PM
(112085)
Hi all, Many thanks for your responses. Yes we need the points for our visa. looks like we are going to have to do the test again. I know they are bringing the new skillselect in 1st July but that is points tested also. Thanks anyway Cheers Sandy
From jimboman

To KathrynG

23 May 2012 11:23 PM
(112086)
I watched my OH and kids get their citizenship today. Sadly, I couldn't take part. We all arrived in June 2007 so we all qualified for citizenship after two years. However, we put it off for a bit and then I was offered a job in China. I was over there for six months last year and on my return we applied for citizenship. My OH and kids qualified but I didn't (because I had spent more than three months of the last twelve outside of Australia even though I was working for an Australian compnay and paying taxes in Australia???) So to sum it up. I moved here in 1970 aged 8 and did most of my schooling here, got my driving licence and my first job and left in 1979. I came back in 2007 and in 2009 qualified for citizenship but after another two years failed to qualify because my Australian employer sent me overseas to work on an Australian recources project? My kids and OH are citizens after four years of residency but my (aggregate) 14 years counts for nothing? As the Aussies say (pinched from FRIENDS) Go Figure.......
From KathrynG

To jimboman

24 May 2012 6:46 PM
(112088)
We had a concern for one of our boys. When we moved to Victoria he was bullied, in the end he broke the bullies nose but was expelled. He went off the rails and we had no one to help us... we had only been in the country 6 months. We did not know where to turn. He disappeared for days, got into alsorts of trouble and involved with gangs, drugs, police etc... he was only 15, in desperation we walked into centrelink and asked to see a social worker. We finally got him help (after 15 months) but because he had been in trouble with the police we thought this may go against him when it came to the citizenship. We did have to get his good behaviour bonds sent to immigration but he had been out of trouble for two years so he was OK. It was a worry for a while and another aspect of moving here... up rooting children can have devastating effects. The police said they were surprised at his behaviour considering his well brought up background, they said his manners where impecable. They were really good at helping us help him. I know more than I ever wanted to know about the law and the underground drugs and gangs now.
From KathrynG

To jimboman

24 May 2012 6:56 PM
(112089)
I have to say that even though the law can be tight and services here are governed quite a bit by the government, it has made this country successful and kept it from recession. I know that is no consolation to you and like you say the rest of the time you lived here counted for nothing... I suppose this is one area that needs to be looked at, each case should be considered on its own merit and other factors like you are living here and have lived here for a long time taken into account. My eldest lad was going to go to univ, we had been here 12 months, we could not get him an hex fund because we were not citizens, so thought it would be better to send him to live with family in the UK and go to univ there in the hope he could get a univ grant there. We got told that he would have to pay International fees as opposed to British citizen fees, this was an increase of about ten thousand pounds. He had lived in the UK for 16 years, held a British passport and obviously was educated there, but this counted for nothing. I also questioned polish people living in the UK but were not citizens, only to be told they would get the lower fees because they were living there. Completely crazy.
From jimboman

To KathrynG

24 May 2012 7:27 PM
(112094)
Mad world we live in. Rules are applied to the law abiding and to the letter of the rule. I actually know someone who came here aged 6 months and left aged 21 to live with her new husband in the UK. She flew back when things turned sour and should have arrived back 2 days before her re-entry visa expired. She stopped over in Hong Kong, her connecting flight here was cancelled and she arrived in Perth at 6am the day after her visa expired. She was sent back to Hong Kong and had to stay there for 6 months while her 'family reunion' visa application was assessed (her mum and dad, 3 sisters and brother all lived in Perth). I went to school with her brother. This was about 20 years ago and re-entry visas can now be renewed off shore as a result of this case and many others like it. All it needed really was an immigration official with half an ounce of commonsense to let her in one day late(actually 6 hours late), but sadly commonsense is a dirty word nowadays.