Archived Discussion Topic

Parent migration       started by fran on 03 Feb 2006   (6590)
Message InfoMessage
From fran

03 Feb 2006 9:45 AM
(27049)
Has anyone on this site sponsored their retired parents migration to Australia? Myself and my sister now live here in Perth, and we would love our parents to join us. They would be financially independant, are both in good health, and are comparatively young, both being 66yoa. I have looked at some government sites, which are very complex, and my impression so far is that it is expensive ($30,000 approx each for visa application and $14,000 bond in total for the two of them), and that there are very limited places available for this kind of migration. Any advice, ideas etc would be welcome, and if anyone has actually done it I would love to hear your experience. Thanks, Fran.
From victoria59

To fran

26 Dec 2006 9:30 AM
(48835)
Fran, I was reading through the posts about parents and happened to read your message. Can you tell us how it all worked out? Did your parents migrate? v
From Gollywobbler

To victoria59

28 Dec 2006 1:54 AM
(48870)
Hi V My mother's Contributory Parent 143 visa was granted about 3.5 months ago and has now been validated, so all is well there. We did not use an agent. The DIMA website is incredibly confusing to start with but once you get the hang of how parent visas work they are actually quite easy to do on your own. If you are considering this for your own parents, then I would suggest you start here, and focus only on the 3 visas with 'Contributory' in the titles: http://www.immi.gov.au/migrants/family/parent-outside.htm Basically, the options are to go straight for the CP visa which confers immediate PR, or do it as a two-tier arrangement, by obtaining the temporary CP 173 visa first. I would say that 2/3 to 3/4 of CPs choose to go straight for the 143 visa, to avoid endless messing about. The CP visa seems expensive at first sight but I don't believe that it is. It grants immediate access to one of the best medical systems in the world, free at the point of delivery. As the parents have not been living in Australia and paying tax there, a one-off contribution towards their future health-care costs as they get older seems reasonable to me. Also, because 3,500 CP visas are available each year, it is possible to get one within about a year from applying. With the non-contributory parent visa, only 1,000 visas a year are available. In August 2006, apparently DIMA estimated that there are currently about 17,000 parents in the official Queue for this visa. Because it takes so long, there is a significant risk that the parents' health could go wrong during the inordinate wait because they have to pass meds at the end of the wait. Sing out if I can help any further. Best wishes Gill
From victoria59

To Gollywobbler

28 Dec 2006 4:25 AM
(48872)
Hi Gill: Thank you so much for this email. This info really helps, especially when I know that it all worked out for your mother. How long did it take her to get the visa? Did she pay 30,000 when DIMA approved her visa? Noone would pay all that money and then be told that they were denied the visa, right? Also, my dad will be over 70 yrs old at the time of the application. Do you think Contributory Aged Parent visa would work faster that regular Contributory Parent Visa? I cannot find even approximate time schedule for it. My dad will not want to work, but mom, who is also retired, probably will. As far as I know, all parent visas give them the right to work, correct? Is your mom eligible for any financial support from the government other than Medicare? I will be the only person supporting my parents, and any money would obviously help. Did you have to have a certain salary to be the parent sponsor? Thank you so much! Your message was really helpful. v
From Gollywobbler

To victoria59

28 Dec 2006 6:40 AM
(48878)
Hi Vicky Contributory Parent visas are taking about a year to process at present. YOur parents ages are not a problem. An old dear from Devon, aged 97, was granted a CP visa in August 2005. My mother was 86 soon after her visa was granted, so your parents are positively youngsters, chooks! Yes, your Parents would have unlimited access to Medicare as soon as they arrive in Australia and if they want to work, they can do any job that they want. The big money is not requested until just before the visa is granted. They held Mum's money for 4 days before granting the visa because there was one final step to sort out. However, a friend of mine got the bank draft for her mother's big chunk hand-delivered to the Parents Centre in Perth one morning, and the visa was granted later the same day. My sister lodged the Bond ($14,000 AUSD for a couple) on Friday 8 Septeember. Mum's visa was granted 7 days later on Friday 15 September. I am not sure about financial help from the Government. If you mean help from Centrelink by way of State Benefits, I think the safe answer is 'No - not until the Parents have lived in Australia for 10 years.' However, we have found out that the Pharmaceutical Benefit Scheme is nothing to do with Centrelink. If Mum pays something like $900 for routine drugs within a year, apparently each prescription therafter would only cost around $4.70 instead of the usual $27 or so. (I live in the UK - my sister lives in Oz - so I am not sure of the actual numbers, but they are roughly as I say.) Obviously, this is extortionate considering that OAPs get free drugs in the UK, but my view of it is that in the event of a medical crisis, even the public hospitals in Australia are a LOT better than in the UK, and any hospital treatment or drugs whilst in hozzy in Oz are completely free. Your parents would continue to receive their UK State Pensions, but they get a reduced rate if they are not in the UK and if they are living outside the UK they would not get the winter heating allowance etc. With your question about being the Sponsor, you need to be aware of the difference between the Sposor and the Assurer. They are often the same person, but the two 'Legal Hats' differ from one another in very significant ways. The Sponsor is nearly always a child of the applicants. The Sponsor undertakes that if the parents fall on hard times during their first two years in Australia, the Sponsor will provide accommodation and financial assistance so as to ensure that his/her Parents will not become a burden on the Australian state benefits system. However, the Sponsor's obligation ends after 2 years. The Assurer need not be the same person as the Sponsor. The Assurer need not be related to the parents or to the Sponsor, and up to 3 people can club together to provide the Asurance of Support. The Assuerers need not be related to each other either. However, the Assurer - or Assurers if there is more than one - are income-tested. To put it simply, if the Assurers have no children and between them they want to Assure a couple, then if they are giving an AOS prior to 1 July 2007, they would have to prove that between them they have received *net* (after tax) income of not less than
From victoria59

To Gollywobbler

28 Dec 2006 7:41 AM
(48881)
Hi Gill! Thank you SO much for this email! It really really helps. You would be a very successful immigration agent! :) I have not even moved to OZ yet, but I want to find out what the options are for everyone in my family so that I don't get a later surprise of not being able to bring them over. I will be moving by myself, no husband or kids. So, I will have to make sure that my income is at the appropriate level..whew! That's a lot of pressure. I don't have any friends there yet, and I will want to sponsor both of my parents by myself. If I understood you correctly, if a friend of mine in OZ agrees to co-assure my parents, that person doesn't have to be related or connected with me in any way other than agreeing to sign the paper, right? Thank you!!! v
From Gollywobbler

To victoria59

28 Dec 2006 9:00 AM
(48883)
Hi again Vicky Thanks for your kind words, but I wouldn't last two minutes as a migration agent! I would w-i-l-t if I were expected to answer questions about which skilled visa to go for. You are absolutely right to consider every member of your family before you make the big move yourself. You don't say who the other members of the family are, however, apart from your parents. Two caveats: For Parent-migration, 50% or more of the applicants' children must be resident in Australia, with PR status or citizenship. If you have siblings, step-siblings or half-siblings, there may be problems unless enough of them move to Oz before your parents attempt to. This is the 'Balance of Family Test.' It & Health are the two key-criteria for Parent migration. Secondly, there is a rule that an individual cannot Assure more than 2 migrants at a time. The AoS for the Contributory Parent visa lasts for 10 years. If you are one of their Assurers, you would not be able to Assure anyone else until after the 10 years is up. If you Assured a sibling first, you would have to wait 2 years for that AoS to expire before you could Assure your parents thereafter. Realistically, I think that if I were in your shoes and a sibling wanted to move to Oz, I would make the sibling get a visa that did not have to be sponsored or Assured by me, in order for me to be available for our parents' visa instead. Yes, you are right about the co-assurer. The other Assurer would not have to be related to you or your parents in any way. A friend of yours would be fine for this purpose. However, it is a potentially onerous obligation for a friend to take on. You and they would be jointly and severally liable to indemnify Centrelink - ie, Centrelink could come after either one of you for the whole amount of any debt owed to Centrelink by your parents. They would not come after one of you for 50% of the debt and try to chase the other for the remainder. Because of the family tie, they would probably demand 100% from you. Whether or not you would be able to prise a contribution out of your co-assurer would be your problem, not Centrelink's. You are TOTALLY right to be as cautious as you are being. Do not under any circs be tempted to try to cut any corners with the research. There are no short-cuts with this visa-stuff, as you probably know from your own application. I'll answer your questions as best I can for as long as you care to continue to ask them. Having a right to live in Oz permanently is the thing my mother has wanted the most since Dad died. Mum's only grandchildren are in Australia and she dotes on them totally. She is so THRILLED to know that she can see them every day for the rest of her life if she wants to (and they will allow it) that I am now on a campaign to try to give all other parents the same sense of certainty and security wherever possible. Nite Gill
From victoria59

To Gollywobbler

28 Dec 2006 10:14 AM
(48884)
Hi Gill, You are so sweet. Thank you for being so compassionate and helpful! I am so glad your mom is enjoying the grandkids, that's my parents' dream (for one day) too. I have only one sister, and we both live in the US right now. However, I have been so focused on moving and telling her all good things about OZ that I am pretty sure she will move there shortly after me. THANK YOU for telling me about the assurance limit that I did not know about (even after hours of reading DIMA materials). It means that she will have to get her own visa, and I can take care of my parents. I was thinking that she might just come and get a job, and hopefully get a permanent sponsored visa without leaving OZ. She wouldn't qualify for the Independent Skilled Visa, but with the job offer she should be fine. I hope it can work like that because going back to the US would create problems for her. In any case, thank you SO much for your advice and info! BTW, are you planning on moving to OZ any time? v
From Gollywobbler

To victoria59

28 Dec 2006 11:56 AM
(48885)
Hi again Vicky I think that what happens with reaearching the Australian stuff is that you get brain-ache, for a start! You have to read that website over and over again, follow every sub-link there is etc etc. You have to repeat that dozens of times, in my experience - literally dozens. You may not have gathered yet that you have to have lived in Australia for 2 years before you can sponsor anyone else for migration to Oz. A period of temporary residence counts towards the two years, but the sponsor must have a PR visa before the sponsorship form is dated and sent off. In theory, the PR vusa need only have been granted 24 hours earlier, but I wouldn't want to take it that close to the wire. I think I'd wait for a good six weeks thereafter at least. Therefore you will undoubtedly have oodles of time in which to absorb all the details fully before you can actually make an application for a CP visa on your parents' behalf, so don't worry about it too much at this stage. You will pick it all up as you go along if you read the forums and slave over the DIMA website as well. You are going to loathe and detest me for landing you with yet another visa to read about, but..... Your sister. I agree with you. Get her into Oz on a temporary visa if need be. My sister had one for about 3 or 5 years until she got an Employer Sponsored PR visa instead. They are OK, as far as I know. Your sister could then upgrade to one of the permanent skilled visas, though I'm not sure which one. However, once you and your parents all have PR in Oz, tehn your sister may be eligible for a Remaining Relative visa instead. Please see here: http://www.immi.gov.au/panoptic/search.cgi?collection=dima-meta&query=Remaining+Relative&form=simple&num_ranks=10&Search=Go If your sister is onshore by then you would opt for the onshore version and vice versa, but the basic criteria are the same. Do remember that there is a difference between Sponsor and Assurer. They would not let you Assure your sister at the same time as Assuring both parents, but they may well allow you to sponsor her as well. If she has been living and working in Oz, she will have made friends of her own. One, two or three of her friends might be willing to Assure her instead, since the obligation on the Assurer of a Remaining Relly only lasts for 2 years. I suspect that the skilled route to PR may not be the only one for your sister. No - I regard Oz as my sister's territory and have never had a wish to live there myself. She used to jabber about Oz ever since she was about 5 (no kidding.) It somehow grabbed her attention in some way when she was only tiny and she was absolutely determined to go and live there. I prefer the UK. Cheers Gill
From victoria59

To Gollywobbler

29 Dec 2006 1:58 AM
(48892)
Hi Gill: Great info again, thank you! I looked at a visa for my sister, and it looks really doable! Do you know what the wait would be? I read that silblings are last on the waiting list. Does that apply to the remaining relative visa? Also, why would you wait 6 weeks after 2 yrs in OZ before applying for the parents' visa? Have a great night! v
From Gollywobbler

To victoria59

30 Dec 2006 10:43 PM
(48932)
Hi V The raason why I would leave a margin for error on timing when to lodge your parents' application is because I'n a cautious type with this stuff, that's all. In theory, all that you have to prove is that you are 'settled' in Oz. That is normally regarded as being two years. In theory, there is no reason why you shouldn't go abroad for a holiday during that period, but you don't want to have to argue with a bureaucrat who is convinced that you have not spent the right number of nights in Australia, I reckon. Pleaae see here: http://www.austlii.edu.au/cgi-bin/sinosrch.cgi?method=any&query=Contributory+Parent+visa+Bsponsor&meta=Fau&mask_path=auFcasesFcthFfederal_ct&mask_path=auFcasesFcthFFCAFC&mask_path=auFcasesFcthFMRTA I don't know much about the Remaining Relative visa, but there are probably loads of cases if you tell Austlii the name and tell it to look in the Migration Review Tribunal cases. As far as I know, there isn't a quota for Remaining Relative the way there is with the parent visas. However, Policy is that skilled applications get more priority in terms of processing than the Family Stream, with the exception of spouses/Partners and children. However, if your sister is already living and working in Oz on a 457 visa, she would be able just to continue on that visa until the Remaining Relative cisa is granted. so you are unlikely to be unduly bothered about how long the processing takes. I think it is more important to note that your Parents would need to have PR in Australia, and be living there, before you launch a Remaining Relative application for your sister. She might become eligible to migrate in her own right anyway, on one of the skileld visas perhaps? Obviously, with you sponsoring and Assuring your Parents, the skilled route for your sister might be easier, with the Remaining Relly visa in the locker as the 'insurance policy' if one of the skilled visas proved not to be possible. Cheers Gill