Archived Discussion Topic

Perth Education Quality Help!       started by jamesgrant on 02 Oct 2006   (9696)
Message InfoMessage
From jamesgrant

02 Oct 2006 2:10 AM
(41839)
Hi I have an offer to move to Perth on a 457 4 year visa and am hoping to move in Jan/Feb 07. My wife and I are currently doing the analysis of the pros and cons etc and one of the main concerns relates to the reality of quality of the education and how our kids might fit in when we return back to Scotland in 4 years time. The kids have just started P1 and P7 in Scotland and we think they would be in the same years in Feb 07 in Perth so would just redo a few months work from Scotland. We have heard some horror stories secondhand of people who returned to Scotland and then their kids went back a year when they started school again We are looking at the Western Suburbs and most of the public schools look pretty good so maybe we are worrying unnecessarily Any view or experiences welcome Many thanks James
From mel00

To jamesgrant

02 Oct 2006 5:49 AM
(41870)
Hi The education is very poor unless you pay for private schooling, but then again you have a waiting list to contend with. I am talking from experience. My daughter was behind on all her subjects when we returned and I had to pay for a tudor to get her back on track. That is possibly the worst thing about australia it lacks a really good education system. You just need to get their names down for a private school. thanks
From DoMoll

To mel00

02 Oct 2006 6:43 AM
(41874)
I notice this post has 11 ticks - is that an indication that people are agreeing with it? If it is that is quite depressing I think. Can anyone shed any more light on the actual reasons why it is considered so poor? Is it maybe because they start later than ours that they seem 'behind' at the same age? Or is it something completely different?
From Shari3

To DoMoll

02 Oct 2006 7:05 AM
(41875)
Hi There have been a few discussions about this previously, so you could try finding some of these - shows more of a balance - some people do believe that the education is poor while others believe it is just different. And it also depends on what you personally tbink is important education-wise. On the whole, I've always thought that education is first-class in Australia (I've been educated to university level in oz). I personally don't like the amount of pressure put on very young children in the UK, I think they start homework and exams too early over here, and there is real culture of my child can do this first and that first. I am confident that my children will receive an excellent education in Australia, along with benefitting from the wider curriculum that is often on offer. Shari
From jackboy

To mel00

02 Oct 2006 8:38 AM
(41880)
Hi I don't think the education system is poor. It's certainly different. Education here seems to be more rounded - based on values and a holistic approach to life, along with more traditional school subjects (which are vitally important obviously). I have experience of primary school ed (from my son), and I also have experience with school leavers (because I teach at Uni). And although, yes, your child may have difficulty streaming back into a UK school after a few years here, so what if you are going to stay here? The experience they get at school (IMHO) is wonderful, and also I see no real difference in the skills and abilities of school leavers here compared to the UK. If anything Aussie kids are more confident and open minded. However I would say that if you choose to go private for whatever reason, it is much more affordable than in the UK. We originally thought we might be looking at private, but after even a short while here we think the public system has everything we need. Another beautiful day in Perth today!!! Cheers Fiona
From nadineun

To jamesgrant

02 Oct 2006 11:03 AM
(41883)
Hi We are in Perth on the same visa. My little girl has just started primary, and I think the school system is great! I have noticed that they start learning their letters and numbers later but put emphasis on other things - like exercise (she has to do an obstacle course every day - which is great!), learning about the world and other cultures! I would say that she is actually learning a lot more than she would in a British school, but not necessary curriculum led ... I am very very pleased with the school. We are south of the river and the best school here is Rossmoyne High School. In fact I have heard that many people think it's the best school in Perth. We are in the catchment area for it, which to be honest was a fluke. To be in this area, you need to look at the suburbs of Bateman and Bulls Creek. I can let you know about them if you are interested ... All suburbs have their own primary school and you will see that they are very different that British schools. They have loads of outdoor playing space and in our case, the school has 4 playgrounds with slides, swings, climbing frames etc. I think it's great! Hope this helps, Nadine I haven't worried at all about my little girl returning to a British school.
From Renie

To jamesgrant

02 Oct 2006 1:53 PM
(41888)
Parents are their children's first educators. Whatever primary school you decide on it is important that you as parents continue to promote a value and respect for education as your children will follow in your footsteps. State or private education? It is really dependent on the quality of teacher that your child has and that will differ from year to year and from school to school. There are great teachers in both systems and (like all other professions) there are are the ones you wish your child didn't have. I must say that the Australian teachers I've come across are dedicated and hard working professionals and that if you have a good teacher combined with parents who are willing to put in effort for their children then your kids won't have any academic problems wherever they are.
From m+j

To nadineun

02 Oct 2006 4:23 PM
(41892)
Hi Nadine I would be interested to here your views on bullcreek, batemane and surrounding areas as we are looking towards those places. we have two children 8 and 6. what in your opinion are the decent, areas with decent schools. also do the schools have to accommodate your children if you live in the catchment area as i understood that they do? Any info that you can give us would be really appreciated as we cannot decide where to start first!
From nadineun

To m+j

02 Oct 2006 7:49 PM
(41901)
Hi When we first arrived we looked at Attadale and Mount Pleasant as these areas are closer to the river and have a really good reputation. These are south of the river. However, we had no joy with the primary schools. According to the government, if you live in a catchment area of a school then the school has to find you a place for your children. I didn't find that the schools were that forthcoming though! I didn't want to have to force the issue, then for my child to start the school under a 'cloud'. We then looked at Bateman, Bull Creek etc. We had a relocation expert helping us find property and she was invaluable. She basically told us the areas to look at - all subjective though!! Bateman is lovely. There is a huge park here, 'Piney Lakes', with native bush, large children's playground, lake and loads of play area. It also has an environmental centre there. This will be the dog walking area (when she comes out of quarantine) and my husband goes running there. There is another park at the end of our street though! To get into Perth takes 20 minutes on the bus but when the new train system is up and running (should be November 2006 but has been pushed back to next year), it will take 9 minues by train! The suburb is older but that means wide streets, lots of greenery and all the houses are on large blocks. Bull Creek is the next suburb along and is again lovely. It has it's own primary school and shopping area. It's very similar to Bateman. Both of these areas qualify for Rossmoyne High School - which is THE school to go to (check individual streets though!). These areas are in the city of Melville, which itself boasts loads of parkland, 3 recreation centres (2 with huge pools, leisure pool, gym etc etc), good libraries, there's a large shopping centre called Garden City (lots of shops and two large departments stores). All in all, a great area. (www.melville.wa.gov.au) If you are looking south of the river, I'd look at these areas and surrounding suburbs (Booragoon, Alfred Cove, Brentwood, Rossmoyne, Ardross). The closer to the river and beach you get, the more 'exclusive' the area - but this is reflected in the price! I must admit that I'm happier we went for Bateman rather than Attadale/Mount Pleasant as the area has a much 'family friendly' feel... if you know what I mean. Prices for buying just keep going up and up! You can pay anything from 300 - 700 dollars a week for a rental. Again, the closer to the river the more expensive. Hope this helps - again subjective though, as I live here (well, it's only been 3 weeks since we got to Perth) Nadine If there's any area that you're not sure of, ask and I'll try and find out about
From charlieb

To mel00

02 Oct 2006 9:21 PM
(41902)
What a load of rubbish!!! Both our children are in the public system here and love it and are doing well. My son has learnt more here in 6 months than he did in 6 years in UK, why?? because he doesn't constantly have to look over his shoulder to make sure he isn't being robbed, he can understand the teachers as they actually speak english!! and best of all the teachers here actually know his name and listen to what he says!!! Oh, interestingly we moved house in the UK to get our son into a certain secondary school as it had such a good reputation and we had nothing but trouble with the whole school including the teachers who quite frankly have lost interest and given up caring! Charlieb
From Boot

To charlieb

02 Oct 2006 9:28 PM
(41903)
were very happy with the education in perth as well
From nadineun

To charlieb

02 Oct 2006 9:42 PM
(41906)
well said!
From peli

To jamesgrant

02 Oct 2006 11:35 PM
(41911)
HI we have gone backwards and forwards between england and aus several times. The first my daughter was in year 4 and my son year one Emma needed help as some of the terms were different to the UK (this was a state school) and her teacher stayed on after school for an hour once a week to help her at her own suggestion and free which is something that would never happen in the uk. also after a couple of months emma was ill and they couldnt contact me on the phone so her teacher not only walked her home (we were 4 roads away) she collected her little brother and brought him home so he would not be distressed when he couldnt find Emma at break. beleive me that would never happen in the Uk I have worked in all stages of schools in the office. we returned home to the uk after a year as work dried up. then when daughter in year 10 son year7 we tried again this time paying privately my children were both middle ability students although Emma was in top maths group in the UK she could not cope with the maths in aus basically in the Uk they are taught to answer exam paper questions and not the subject as a whole as would appear in aus. my son found it ok though after a couple of months worried about Emma we returned to UK she has just taken her GCSE and passed maths A* this would not have happened in Aus because they are expected to know more not because the education is poor they are just taught more of the subject and in the uk it is specific to exam board questions we now have full proof of this so it will be problem if you keep swapping . however the outcome is that we are returning next June when she will have taken as levels and they give good points for this and GCSE which can count towards end of schooling and uni so hopefully all will be fine in the end.She would like to be a teacher of primary students and the unis have been most helpfull
From Boot

To peli

03 Oct 2006 12:15 AM
(41912)
Peli you are so right. My friend's daughter is in high school (private) here doing maths and her parents both say that the maths standard is very high. In our kids' school, there is a new family from South Africa and their mum has also said how advanced the maths is. They do start kids more gently in primary but they seem somehow more confident and comfortable with themselves when they go on to high school that way. I'm sure there must be kids who don't enjoy school in Aus but haven't met any yet. They all seem so happy in my two's primary school - and the facilities and equipment (playgrounds, computer lab, library etc) are fab.
From m+j

To nadineun

03 Oct 2006 5:44 AM
(41933)
Hi Nadine Thanks for the information that you gave, i must admit that the areas you mentinoed we have been researching so thanks, we will continue with it. Jo
From nadineun

To m+j

03 Oct 2006 10:32 AM
(41954)
Glad I could help!
From lisalee

To nadineun

03 Oct 2006 10:25 PM
(41980)
Hi Can anyone advise on how much homework kids get in Perth? My son has just started Y7 in the middle school system and currently is given between 8 - 12 pieces a week. This means all our spare is spent doing homework! He is gradually coming round to the idea of moving to Aus, and would be really pleased if he knew that the pressure of homework isn't so great over there. Thanks for your help. Lisa
From DinkyDi

To jamesgrant

05 Oct 2006 1:40 AM
(42067)
In 4 years time it shouldn't be a problem; it might be if you go back sooner. The kids start formal schooling later and learn to read later here. Combine that with the 6 month offset in term time and it could be a struggle for the younger kid to go back after a year or two. For example P1 in Scotland would correspond to preprimary or even kindy here depending on the age of the child. They don't start learning to read properly until year 1 (aged 6). Other than the reading (and I do think that is poor here for P1 and I'd be prepared to coach your kid a bit in this area yourself) I think it compares well.